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The ENFP at Work

At work, the ENFP is concerned with using their creativity to express themselves and benefit others. ENFPs want to explore the possibilities for themselves and other people, and approach their work with vision and inspiration. They enjoy taking on creative or people-centered problems that call for an imaginative, original solution.

ENFPs are often motivated by their beliefs in humanitarian causes and want work that is consistent with their values. They are particularly interested in helping other people develop as individuals. They tend to choose careers that allow them to pursue ideals of personal growth and artistic expression.

ENFPs dislike routine work and want a variety of tasks and challenges. They prefer to set their own schedule and chafe when saddled with excessive regulations or mundane details. They seek out fun, novel tasks that allow them to be imaginative and relate to other people in an unstructured, supportive way.

The ideal work environment for an ENFP is relaxed and friendly, with few restrictions on creativity. The ideal job for an ENFP allows them to follow their inspiration, satisfy their curiosity, and develop solutions that benefit people in innovative and original ways.

Top Careers for the ENFP

ENFPs are happiest in their careers when they can deploy their vivacious, person-centered nature to express themselves and help others. ENFPs can be found in a wide variety of careers and industries, but the most satisfied ENFPs have found a way to bring creativity and originality into their daily work.

Top careers for the ENFP include:

ENFP Careers to Avoid

It is important to note that any personality type can be successful in any occupation. However, some occupations are well suited to the natural talents and preferred work style of the ENFP, while other occupations demand modes of thinking and behavior that do not come as naturally to the ENFP. Occupations that require the ENFP to operate outside their natural preferences may prove stressful or draining, and often sound unappealing to ENFPs who are choosing a career.

The following occupations have been found to be unpopular among ENFPs, based on data gathered from surveys of the general population.

The ENFP on a Team

ENFPs are enthusiastic, involved team members who are interested in exploring the possibilities for innovation. They enjoy relating to people and hearing their ideas—the more imaginative, the better. Although they are open-minded, they are fundamentally grounded in a sense of values, and look for the principles and motivations behind their teammates’ ideas. ENFPs have little interest in rules, and will encourage their teammates to think outside the box to create a solution that is uniquely theirs. They want to encourage other people to be creative and find their own voice.

ENFPs are most focused on relationships and on ideas, and may have friction with more task-oriented teammates. They relish the task of brainstorming possibilities and options for a project, and are sometimes reluctant to settle on a course of action and move on. They typically shy away from taking on responsibility for details, and can best contribute to a team with their considerable interpersonal skills. They are energetic in their commitment to the group’s mission, and are often good at motivating others and encouraging them to use their talents.

The ENFP as a Leader

In leadership positions, ENFPs convey enthusiasm and excitement for their ideas. Their leadership style tends to be democratic and flexible, with an eye toward developing human potential. They enjoy helping others grow as employees and as people, and grant plenty of freedom to their reports to develop innovative and unique solutions. ENFP leaders motivate with their passion for their ideas and beliefs, and they are often insightful in their assessments of people problems.

Because they are so focused on their ideals, ENFP leaders can sometimes neglect the practicalities of implementation. They are more focused on people than on process, and can lose sight of the ultimate goal as they explore relationships and human development. They may need to develop planning and organizational skills to ensure that their creative ideas become reality.

ENFP Career Stats

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About the Author

Molly Owens is the CEO of Truity and holds a master's degree in counseling psychology. She founded Truity in 2012, with the goal of making quality personality tests more affordable and accessible. She has led the development of assessments based on Myers and Briggs' personality types, Holland Codes, the Big Five, DISC, and the Enneagram. She is an ENTP, a tireless brainstormer, and a wildly messy chef. Find Molly on Twitter at @mollmown.

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