The Top Ten Mistakes that Introverts Unwittingly Make

Categories: INFJ, INFP, INTJ, INTP, ISTJ, ISTP, ISFJ, ISFP

Inspired by a similar post about Extraverts, I'm here to talk about the mistakes that Introverts—myself very much included—may be making without realizing it. Some of them are more obvious than others, but these are some that I've only recently caught myself doing.

1. Coming off as unfriendly

Whether by turning down an invitation to a big, raucous party or by going to that party but then standing quietly in a corner nursing your drink, others might come to the erroneous conclusion that you don’t like people. In reality, you simply find such events overwhelming and unfulfilling.

Start here: If you turn down a friend’s invite to an event that sounds too extraverted for you, make plans with him or her to do something one-on-one or in a smaller group. And try to only turn down invites to the events that you know you are going to hate or when you are completely burnt out. For other times, you should take a chance.

2. Shutting people out

It starts small—a cancelled plan here, an unreturned phone call there—but eventually you might realize that you haven’t had a meaningful interaction with a particular good friend or family member in a long time. You can justify it to yourself by saying, “Yeah, but they could’ve just called me again, so they don’t want to see me that badly,” but what if that’s not true?
Think about it: you think that they don’t care that much because they aren’t continuing to reach out to you, and if they use the same logic about you not reaching out to them, then they’ll start to think you don’t care either.

Start here: Just call them. Make a plan, and don’t cancel it. You can even tell them that you have the tendency to withdraw at times and that it’s nothing personal. However, know that there are times when you cannot withdraw either, like if they’re having a problem in their lives which they need support for. Make sure it’s clear that you do value your relationship with them.

3. Not asking for help

Some Introverts are more staunchly independent than others. If you’re one of these introverts, then it might be hard for you to admit that there is something you can’t do for yourself.

Start here: Ask for help. It’s that simple. Make sure you’re asking the right person, of course—if it’s a work-related question, ask a coworker or your direct supervisor rather than the company’s CEO—but beyond that, I promise you it’s not that scary.

4. Not allowing yourself time to recharge

This mistake is basically the opposite of the first two on this list. Rather than turning down too many invitations, you’re overextending yourself. I know I have a tendency to alternate between the two; after a solid week of being social, I will sink into hermitage. Ideally, you can avoid becoming a total hermit by not draining your social battery in the first place.

Start here: If you’re starting to feel drained, it's alright to turn down an invitation to something that you don’t really care about. Try to schedule your weeks so that you have days without social events.

5. Always expecting others to start the conversation

Remember, even though Extraverts outnumber us (at least in the U.S.), about a third of the population is introverted. That means that there are other people who are afraid to start a conversation as well. Also, not all extraverts are the stereotypical talkative, bubby social butterflies we make them out to be, so try to be the first to initiate a conversation once in awhile.

Start here: If you’re at a gathering with 30 other people, chances are that at least 10 of them are Introverts too, and they’d probably love it if you rescued them from having to start a conversation or from a particularly overbearing, over-talkative extravert! (We Introverts have to help each other out, after all.)

6. Not standing up for yourself (and others)

I wrote an article about confrontation and conflict not too long ago where I mentioned that extraversion is correlated with assertiveness. As an Introvert, you might have a tendency to let more dominating personalities push you or people you care about around.

Start here: You don’t have to yell at anyone or start a brawl. Standing up for yourself can be as simple as saying “I disagree.” And standing up for someone else can be as simple as saying, “Please don’t talk like that about ____.”

7. Bailing on important events

This mistake is beyond turning down an invitation to go out for drinks on a random Friday night; this mistake means skipping your niece’s first birthday party or your best friend’s wedding to stay home and watch Netflix. There are some events in life that you really just have to suck it up and go to if you want to maintain your relationships and avoid hurting the people you care about.

Start here: Depending on what exactly the event is, you might be able to go and then leave early. You don’t have to go out to the bars at 1 AM after your friend’s wedding reception. You can give your sister a time that you need to leave her party by. If leaving early is not a feasible option, you can still catch your breath by going outside for “fresh air” or by volunteering to help your sister with a task during the party.

8. Thinking that you’re deeper/wiser than your extraverted friends and family

I think this tendency stems from being a part of a culture that has undervalued introversion for too long. Now that introversion is more talked about and appreciated, there has been somewhat of a backlash against Extraverts, which is just silly.

Start here: Extraversion and introversion have no bearing on intelligence—just like all the other preferences in Myers-Briggs or the Big 5. Recognize that being talkative and loving crowds of people does not make someone stupid or shallow.

9. Spending too much time in your own head (and getting in your own way)

Being alone gives you opportunities to think and get to know yourself better. However, it can also give you too much time to overanalyze everything. Even when you’re among other people, you may be more present in your own head than you are in the group, which can lead to an even greater inhibition of action than you normally would have.

Start here: Make a conscious effort to be present when you’re with other people or even completing a task on your own. Practicing mindfulness is one way to flex this muscle.

10. Failing to appreciate the people around you

As an Introvert, you may appreciate it more when people cancel plans with you than when they make them. I’ve certainly felt this way before. It’s easy to take having friends who want to make plans with you for granted.

Start here: You can appreciate your alone time and your time with friends. Make sure your actions show that you enjoy spending time with your friends and that you do care about them. No man (or woman) is an island, after all.

Rachel Suppok

Rachel holds a B.S. in Neuroscience and usually a cup of coffee. She is an INTJ, but she is not a super-villain. Yet.

Folow Rachel on Twitter @rsuppok.

Comments

brownin329 (not verified) says...

These are not "mistakes." These are ways non-introverts see us. I expect better from a fellow introvert.

Guest (not verified) says...

Considering the fact that this article was written by an introvert, I'm pretty sure this isn't a biased view from the non-introverted perspective. I am an introvert and I do agree with the ten characteristics. I have to say as well though, they aren't "mistakes", they're just very strong characteristics. But these are characteristics that are potentially harmful to ourselves and those around us, so we should be more aware nonetheless.

Sprezzatura (not verified) says...

I think "Mistakes" is the click-bait word in the title of this article. The word is used deliberately, not to be specific, but rather to get people to click on the headline.

Guest (not verified) says...

If they do not write "mistakes" people do not click. It is just marketing copy style and it is valid in my opinion

Guest (not verified) says...

Hahaha, that's where the we're better thing comes into place. There was one of these for extraverts and most E's in the comments said "OMG!! I do all these things" while most I's insulted them for it. I'm an introvert and I know that I'm guilty of half of these things.

WK (not verified) says...

Agreed!

Guest (not verified) says...

i agree with this comment. Why do we have to make ourselves fit in to the extrovert way, it isnt the right way its just different. I highly reccomend you all read the book Quiet by Susan Cain

gloverlicious says...

Hey, I consider myself somewhat extrovert but my husband is introvert. It is not that one or the other has to fit into the other's ways but more like "how can we coexist together the way we are without hurting each other". Not that one way or the other is more correct, but just if you care about the people around you, how to show them that you do care, because the introvert people that I know come off as they care about nobody but themselves... and it seems like you can isolate yourself so much... but I guess that's what introverts like in the first place, so why should we worry :) but still, we are social creatures, we shouldnt be alone, I think :)

Guest (not verified) says...

Your comment makes me laugh a lot. I'm an introvert and I know that I don't try to fit in with E's and neither do fellow introverts. Actually, they try to change for us a lot but we can't see it.

Guest (not verified) says...

Umm.... You do know that nobody's forcing you to fit in with Extraverts. You can choose to be loud or quiet. No ones making you do anything.

Guest (not verified) says...

I don't think anybody is trying to force us to fit the extrovert 'gameplan', but it's worth realizing that as introverts we often do things that shoot ourselves in the foot and that it's worth pushing past the boundaries of our comfort zones every once in a while.

If you are content with the idea of sitting at home and not pursuing a social life just because "Well, that's me, that's who I am, it won't change any time soon", then that's your perogative. In that case, this article really was not written for you. I personally find the idea extremely unappealing and would rather take steps to avoid it, even if doing so puts me in situations I'm not totally comfortable in.

Dizzyd (not verified) says...

I'm an INFP, and 2, 6, and 9 really spoke to me. I can be at a party and find myself wishing I was anywhere else; or with friends, I can be the outgoing type, who once I get going, you can't shut me up! I'm getting more outspoken in my middle age, but still have a hard time being assertive. I think that she is saying that you have to be aware of how people may see us, not so we're ashamed, but so we can let people know that it's not them, it's just how we roll!

Kat Mueller (not verified) says...

I agree. I'm glad I'm not the only one who didn't care for this article. :(

Kat Mueller, Blogger

www.kat-mueller.com

Guest (not verified) says...

Wow! you were so on target there!! you mentioned everything my friends always complain about

MyTruityThoughts (not verified) says...

Thank you for sharing the article! I am an INTJ and based on feedback and the "playback" film in my mind's eye, I'm sure taking these 10 mistakes to heart will improve my relationships. But Oh God, why!?! Sorry... that was rhetorical.

Guest (not verified) says...

I own many of these "mistakes". I also have a hearing problem. Wore hearing aids for over 40 years. Amazingly, my career was mostly in high tech sales and marketing after a few years in engineering.

I suffer mostly with #8. I'm aware of "cognitive overloading" and its cause for dementia. Consequently; I easily tune out when individuals; or, a group are not in "exchange mode". I also own the "gift of gab" as my raizon d'etre is curiosity of all things. I enjoy open and interesting people with broad minds and unique life's experiences. I'm also too picky with my associations because of the cognitive overloading issue. How do I deal with #8?

Please comment.

Guest (not verified) says...

(Not sure what cognitive overloading has to do with it, but anyways.)

Do you mean #8 or #9? I have a problem with both of those, actually :) For #8, I would try having some meaningful, "deep" conversations with Extraverts and spend some more time with them. For #9, I would write down the thoughts that were really bugging me and let them go. And then go out and DO something to forget about them (if they're not all that important), not constantly obssess about them, not let them burden you down and cloud your mind. Hope that helps! :)

Lavita Mahan (not verified) says...

I disagree with #6 because I know many introverts that do not suffer fools gladly nor allow themselves or the people they care about to be trampled. My Meyers Briggs type is INTJ. I will allow others to lead however they better know what they are doing. My introvertism is related to how my energy level is drained after interacting with others. I am an introvert not a door mat.

Didn't Care 'Til You Were Wrong says...

I was thinking the same thing. I may be introverted, but heaven help you if you try to make an ignorant decision in my presence. Additionally, I've talked with many an argumentative introvert, and at least half of the debaters I know are introverted or near to it. Perhaps IXFX types struggle more with #6 than IXTXs, though I cannot particularly see many of the IXFXs I know refusing to speak up when they have a disagreement. Overall, that one seemed a little strange to me.

Guest (not verified) says...

That really speaks to me. Thanks for the reminder. :)

Guest (not verified) says...

Good reminders of our natural/typical social behavior! I found this helpful and interesting, although I don't know if I can change much even though it would be positive for those who care about me, I don't know if I can afford the energy to give any more time for outings. I get so exhausted dealing with people, even my friends and family. But again, good reminders - so thanks!

BrittanyS. (not verified) says...

As a fellow introvert, I fully agree with this (and honestly needed to hear it). Understanding and being aware of your introverted tendencies should be used as a tool to thrive—not as a crutch or an excuse to do things you don't always want to do. We all have certain tendencies, introverted or not, that aren't inherently bad, but when taken too far, they can be detrimental—and that's where the mistake lies.

Guestmaki (not verified) says...

1 2 3 and 9 is me definitely the other mistakes not so much

Antoanela (not verified) says...

It was good to hear these things and how they can affect our relationships and lives. I had some awareness of them, as I can often slip into many of these behaviours and risk alienating friendships and feel guilt. Thank you for giving this some structure.

Lawrie (not verified) says...

As an introvert I agree with and do all of these things. I'm so conscious of them that when they (often) happen, I beat myself up about it. I love that there were ways to break the 'habits', because once you start some of these things they become habit forming...

Shipwreck (not verified) says...

I am an ISFJ with codependancy issues (people pleasing), an empath with poor boundaries and find group situations sometimes overwhelming. I have been pretty reclusive for about 15 years, only attending important events. I like one to one and I love people (but not groups). If people see me as unfriendly, I try not to worry about it as that makes it worse.

Guest (not verified) says...

As a 76 year old introvert I finally allow myself to be me with no guilt, no responsibility for others opinions spoken and unspoken. I am not going to take that on as expected. I am courteous and do not speak ill to others when they are loud and get in my face too forcefully. I avoid if possible and tell them I do not like to be toldhow to be when pushed to hard.

Why is it up to me to be the one to understand instead of understood. ???

Guest (not verified) says...

Perhaps they do not know you as well as you know them because you need to actively tell them about yourself and open up more? Also, you may not be able to feel it when they understand you, so who knows whether they do or not? They may understand you better than they show. A really good way to find out is to engage in some more "soul-deep" conversations (the opposite of small talk) that delve into your (and their) passions, dreams, interests, values, etc.

Guest (not verified) says...

I am perfectly willing to have conversations with others. However when it is all about their thoughts, their ideas; and my input is really not welcomed, my listening skills end after a couple of hours, Let them talk to themselves and leave me to my own thoughts.
I am an INTP.

Guest (not verified) says...

Oooooooo... yes, that is hard. And I know I haven't really met these people and don't know what they're like, but in that case, it's probably not your problem and you shouldn't agonize over it too much :) And maybe they're going through a rough time and need a listening ear and don't realize you want someone to understand you as well...who knows? Understanding others is a gift; use it wisely.
And also, sometimes you just have to wait patiently and over time they'll open up. And then other times, you have to actively go out to social events or places like the park, or the gym, or the ice rink, or the swimming pool, and strike up conversations with new people who don't have any judgements about you

(PS: Sorry; I just read back over my previous comment, and it seemed a bit harsh. I hope I didn't offend you or anything, so please excuse any rudeness in there.)

Judi Brown (not verified) says...

- An introvert in the late sixth decade old, I've felt at times that I'm the one who ends up trying to understand others, but, wish 99% of others would consider attempting to understand me. I don't regard myself a doormat for other's often unreasonable expectations for me 'to be' the way THEY expect me to be.

ameliaruby says...

Can you make one for INTJs who want to be understood? I'm an INTJ and I never had very many friends as a kid because I came off as kind of aloof and nobody understood me.

Guest (not verified) says...

I have problem with 9. My friends will say I am stoning. I seriously don't know what to say when they are talking about something I don't know or in Chinese(I am an Indian). Then no choice need to start to do number 9. Please help me.

Inotila (not verified) says...

This talks just about me, but i don't do them because i want to, its just something part of me. I mostly turn down people because i feel going to a certain gathering wont do me any good, forgetting that in the process i'm hurting someone close to me. Right now i'm working on my character, just to try and relate with people. But i have a problem, people do not understand me, but they want me to understand them, i got married sometime last year, and my own husband does not understand me, which hurt me so much. I need help with this really, because living with someone who doesn't understand you is so painful. We tend to argue many times because of this.

Guest (not verified) says...

Perhaps you should have a talk, a real, deep talk about your and his values and interests and your conflicts with him and stuff -- you know, sort things out. Take some time to get to know each other. Yes, and I know the feeling of not being understood. And, I guess, not understanding.

gloverlicious says...

My husband and I have the same issues. Even though everybody things I am an extrovert, I am actually INFJ but my husband is an extreme introvert. His ultimate pleasure is playing his video game, being by himself in his office all day/all night... If he is around us, he doesn't like talking to us much, at all would be perfect. On family gatherings he is always where nobody else is, by himself. It comes off as very egocentric and uncaring, like we don't matter to him. I think I understand it that this is who he is but it is still hard to live with somebody who only wants to live with himself and does things if only benefit/please him with disregard for others. I am not saying that this is how you are as well, just saying that this is how I perceive my husband. What if you try to do things because it pleases somebody else to be with you? they like your company, they want to be around you because you are a great person... Can you do it for them? Maybe somebody just needs your smile today :) And maybe try to be more outspoken about how and why you feel this way, maybe offer some literature to show what being an introvert means, that is nothing against your husband, so that he doesnt take it personal. Yes, I do feel hurt, ignored,rejected and disrespected, as if what's important to me doesn't matter. Thats why I understand that my husband's alone time is important to him and try to give it to him as much as I can. We set up two family nights to where his presence is requested and he puts the effort to be as interactive with us as he can, and the other nights he has time to himself. Maybe you can find some compromises that could work for both of you. Maybe a professional counselor can help you see things from the other's person prospective. Good Luck!

Guest (not verified) says...

I read these posts as an extrovert trying to find some answers to the behaviour of my introvert friends. I do understand their behaviour but I also feel they don't understand how it can be very off putting to others. One friend I have in particular, accepts invitations and cancels at the last minute...9 times out of ten! She evens cancels arrangements that she makes! I stopped inviting her ages ago but every now and then she will invite me to her home for a one on one evening because that's the only place she feels comfortable. Everything seems to have to be how she wants it because why should she do what others want? She said she hates the phone and says she only has one for her convenience, not for others to contact her! She seemed genuinely shocked when I told her that I actually answer my phone when it rings....

gloverlicious says...

Can please somebody shine a light on me and help me understand better. If you are an extreme introvert, you want to be by yourself most of the time, right? Then how having a family plays out?
Do introverts actually enjoy having a spouse and children or they would actually be happier by themselves?
I am INFJ so I am slightly an introvert myself and can relate to recharging when alone and crowds are exhaustion... but when my husband doesn't want to spend time with us at home, doesn't want to go anywhere with us, refuses to come to the girls' school events... or doesn't want to come to church with us (for an hour a week)because he just doesn't want to, there is nothing in it for him (being important to us is not good enough) just totally not involved... I am not sure if that's him being the introvert or just him not caring about us at all.
Do other introverts (yourself or somebody you know) act like my husband and perceived that as "normal"?
I am not trying to attack introverts, I am just trying to understand to what extend one wants to be alone.
Would you rather be just by yourself and have no family? Is having a family a compromise to introverts just so they can fit social norms?

Guest (not verified) says...

As an introvert speaking discourteous behavior is never okay. Introverts need quiet time to recharge, not being alone most of the time. Introvert is not the same as antisocial. Both introverts and extroverts can be antisocial. They just do it differently. Introverts ignore. Extroverts verbally abuse. Both can be equally friendly. One by listening. The other by entertainng. Guess which is which?

gloverlicious says...

Thank you for taking the time to clerify things for me. It makes more sense now!

Guest (not verified) says...

What you are describing is not an introvert. He may have deep seated emotional issues or addictions that exclude others. Make waves. Don't live your life with his standards of less happiness.

gloverlicious says...

That's encouraging !
Thanks ♡

Guest (not verified) says...

An INFJ who is 'slightly' introverted? That doesn't make sense to me. In order for you to be classed as an INFJ or any other I, introversion has to be the predominant characteristic, so perhaps you're more E than I which could explain why you are confused by your Husband's behaviour. However it sounds to me that your Husband's desire to not interact goes far beyond his introversion. You and your children are the people who he should be closest to, so it could be emotional isolation that he craves because that might be the only way in which he can deal with whatever psychological issues that plague him.

gloverlicious says...

To clarify... before I took this test I thought I was an extrovert because I enjoy being around people. However, I do recharge when I'm left alone in peace and quiet to myself (not forever though, lol)
Even the profile said that many people think of INFJs as extrivert, and that myself included. I guess I used the word "slightly" because I do not like to be alone for too long, and from my husband's comments "I want to be by myself because I'm an introvert and an only child..." I don't quite feel that way and that's why I thought that maybe he is way high "i" and I'm just a "slight" "i" ... I don't know if that makes sence. But I'm an I :) being around a lot of people makes me tired and gives me headackes, I feel like I'm getting information overload and my brain is spinning... not sure if that's a description of an introvert or I have something else going on with my head :)

Guest (not verified) says...

INFJs are sometimes mistaken for extroverts because they appear warm and affable in the company of others. They are people pleasers because of FE. However there in lies the paradox because they can also become very drained in the company of others and need time to recharge in solitude. This period of solitude is dependent on the individual but it's not uncommon for this period to last days, if not weeks. Your degree of introversion may well be lower than your Husband's but it would still be a dominant characteristic within your own cognitive stack. However I do now understand what you meant by 'slightly introverted' because you were comparing yourself to your Husband. It might be an idea not to do this because we are all different. My partner and I are both INFJs but we are very different in lots of respects.

gloverlicious says...

Yes, emotional isolation is right on! Thank you for making it clear that is not part of being an "i". And most importantly, thank you for pointing out that is something he needs rather than not wanting to be with us. He is an INSJ is all about the logic and any plea for me to spend time with me is not logical to him but I am all feelings so I can't make a feeling logical, lol

Guest (not verified) says...

You stated that your Husband is'INSJ' but did you mean INTJ? Because if you did that would explain why you as an INFJ are more inclined to be led by emotions: FE, whereas he is more inclined to be led by logic and analytical reason: ET. Now I'm not saying that he is incapable of emotional reason but this is not his default position and he may well shy away if he's required to exercise it. Perhaps you could all think of activities that you could enjoy as a family, which enables him to apply his logic, while simultaneously allowing for you all to spend some time together.

Guest (not verified) says...

I meant TE.

jennifer_417 (not verified) says...

Ugh. Why does it always seem like the "solution" to being an INFJ is to act more like an extrovert?

Jennifer Lee (not verified) says...

I had to say "hi"--since I'm a Jennifer AND an INFJ, too! Now that I've done that, I may as well comment on your question, although I just signed up to receive these emails, and haven't spent much thought on the subject. I like your quotation marks, since of course being an INFJ isn't a problem to be solved, at least, not more than being any other type. I never "got" the Streisand song that says that you're luckiest if you need people. I'm grateful that I'm an introvert. Rather than feeling pressured to be something I'm not, I think I benefit from being more aware of my inclination to not think objectively when I assume someone is harboring negative feelings about me, or when I inwardly criticize others too harshly, and unnecessarily. I've enjoyed learning about Buddhism, lately. It's perfect for reminding me to really enjoy whatever I'm doing, whether I'm alone or not. It also reminds me that if someone else hates me, is angry with me, resents me, etc., that's their problem, and I don't have to let it be mine. And it also reminds me that it's not my job to judge others; to embrace the world as it is. Please don't think for one minute that I'm really GOOD at it! But I think it does help me to remember that "it is what it is".

MzB (not verified) says...

I wonder if it could be more a matter of the 'solution' to many things being 'balance' .. and if leaning "too much" one way or the other (eg "too" extraverted as well as "too" intraverted) then whatever is the 'opposite' becomes the solution.

jennifer_417 (not verified) says...

Hmm...that's actually a really good point. Thanks for not judging my moment of frustration; I'm usually a bit more patient!

gloverlicious says...

I agree, being balanced would be the best. Don't we all want that, or is just me :) but we are who we are :) and let's be honest, how likely are we to change?
It helps me that now I know myself and let others know me the way I am so they can except me just that way. If they are not happy with what I've got to offer, surely they can find "better" than me, move on. You can never please everybody but I think is nice to understand each other and know where we are coming from.
I'm so grateful for this site!I finally got to know myself better, lol

Guest (not verified) says...

I have often found that when I have conversations with people, they tend to be one-sided. People will talk to me about all sorts of stuff(not just idle chit-chat) so on those occasions they will have my ear. However, as soon as it's my turn to speak, they switch off because they are only interested in themselves. This is draining for an introvert because we (well certainly I) expect the same level of attention to be reciprocated and when it's not, it becomes very tiresome.This is the reason why I shy away from many social events because I don't wish to be surrounded by self serving people. It's been stated on here that introverts need to let people get to know them but how can they when the other person/people merely sees them as empathic sounding boards?

Guest (not verified) says...

Actually, for point number 5, I don't think a third of the party will comprise of introverts. You said that in a general population, yes, a third are introverts. That part is not wrong. But seeing that not many introverts prefer going to a party, there would be a higher proportion of "extroverts" in that setting. And even if they were invited a lot would still cancel. Therefore, I suggest the fraction might be a little closer to a tenth of thirty. Sorry if it may sound accusing, but it bothers me if I don't do anything about this point.

Guest (not verified) says...

Hi
I think that one skill should be able to say no to people who somehow start asking for help soon after meeting them.Maybe I come off as too friendly.I find it very difficult to talk to people, in a guarded manner, you know, by not revealing too much info about myself.I came to know this after many incidents when people were clearly hiding info from me, maybe because they thought I would use it against them.

somebody stalking the forums (not verified) says...

I'm an ambivert, slightly more introverted ISFP. I dislike large parties but absoultely love spending time with a few friends at once. I only stand up for myself if I believe i have to but probably stand up for others too much including strangers which they're not always grateful for (cri) I consider myself probably the least deep and wise person you would ever meet mmm maybe I think that might be more of an intuitive and thinking thing too?

yeh but I'll try working on the problems i have here and on the extraverted one

64CAD says...

I don't think everything describes me very well. Only 1, 2, 5, and maybe 10 described me to some extent. I don't think these "mistakes" are mistakes every introvert commonly makes. And my friends and family are almost all introverted.

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