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INTPs and Other Personality Types

Kindred Spirits

People of the following types are more likely than most to share the INTP's values, interests, and general approach to life. They won't necessarily agree on everything, and there's no guarantee they'll always get along, but they're more likely to feel an easy rapport and have plenty of things in common.

Intriguing Differences

People of the following types are likely to strike the INTP as similar in character, but with some key differences which may make them seem especially intriguing. The INTP may find people of these types particularly interesting and attractive to get to know. Relationships between INTPs and these types should have a good balance of commonalities and opportunities to challenge one another.

Potential Complements

INTPs may not feel an immediate connection with people of the following types, but on getting to know each other, they'll likely find they have some important things in common, as well as some things to teach one other. Although people of these types may not attract the INTP initially, their relationships present a lot of potential to complement and learn from one other.

Challenging Opposites

People of the following types present the most potential for personality clash and conflict with the INTP, but also the best opportunities for growth. Because people of these types have fundamentally different values and motivations from the INTP's, initially, it may seem impossible to relate. But because they are so different, their strengths are the INTP's weaknesses, and if they are able to develop a relationship, they can learn a tremendous amount from each other.

INTPs in Love

INTPs are independent and clever partners. They enjoy engaging intellectually and want an intelligent partner who can match their ability to think critically.

INTPs have little appetite for the mundane aspects of life, and may disregard the usual rituals of a relationship. They are rarely interested in tradition, preferring instead to design a lifestyle that makes sense for the parties involved—even if it looks highly unconventional to other people. They are tolerant of individual preferences but will rarely do something because they are told they "should."

INTPs tend to analyze the theory behind everything, and may interpret human interactions with the detached logic of a psychological researcher. They may find others difficult to deal with when they cannot understand the logic behind their behavior. When things get too emotional, they may retreat to their own world of thoughts and ideas.

INTPs want plenty of space in a relationship to explore their own thoughts, ideas, and interests. They value a partner that appreciates their ingenuity and problem-solving ability, and one that understands their need for autonomy.

INTPs as Parents

As parents, INTPs encourage competence and independent problem solving. They often do not tune in easily to their children's feelings, but will enthusiastically help them to reason out a complex dilemma.

INTPs are usually involved in their own projects or ideas and typically do not take much pleasure in the mundane, day-to-day tasks of caring for children. As a result, the Architect parent may sometimes seem distant to their children, but their true delight in parenting is in sharing exciting ideas and concepts with young minds.

For more information: Please Understand Me II

INTP Communication Style

INTPs can be insightful communicators, when the subject inspires them. Thoughtful and independent, they may not have a great need for conversation, but when discussing complex concepts or innovative ideas they can become quite intense and display a wealth of information and insight. Logical and analytical, they can weigh possibilities endlessly and are great at playing devil’s advocate. They love to pick apart ideas but are not convinced by anything but the most rational of analyses; they can spot a flaw in logic a mile away, and rarely hesitate to point it out.

About the Author

Molly Owens is the CEO of Truity and holds a master's degree in counseling psychology. She founded Truity in 2012, with the goal of making quality personality tests more affordable and accessible. She has led the development of assessments based on Myers and Briggs' personality types, Holland Codes, the Big Five, DISC, and the Enneagram. She is an ENTP, a tireless brainstormer, and a wildly messy chef. Find Molly on Twitter at @mollmown.

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