ENTP
Choose other type

Primary tabs

ENTP Strengths

Fearlessness. One of the ENTP’s greatest strengths and keys to success is his or her boldness in the face of challenge. These are people who are not afraid to try and fail and try again, perhaps thousands of times; they don’t conceive of it as failure, merely another step along the path to success. As they invent and innovate, they are undeterred by doubts, they are barely ruffled when outcomes don’t go as planned and they see all “problems” as opportunities to be embraced and pursued. 

Innovation. In all things—products, procedures and systems—ENTPs know there is always a better way and with the right kind of thinking, they will get there. As a result, they may suffer a lot of seeming failures in their lives, but will enjoy many successes as well. They can be marvelously rich and lose their entire life savings—perhaps a few times within the course of their lives. They live out loud and take risks.

Adaptability. ENTPs are generally go-with-the-flow people. This isn’t to say that they are particularly agreeable individuals, but that they are able to adapt to their circumstances and the problems that arise in life and work. ENTPs can improvise on the fly and come up with creative solutions rapidly. They deal well with fast-paced and frequent change and enjoy the corresponding challenges.

Confidence. Generally speaking, criticism and ostracism have very little effect on ENTPs. They are confident in their skills and talents and believe in the power of their ideas. Opposition on the way to success is to be expected and they don’t take it personally; they’d rather prove their detractors wrong. 

What are your ENTP strengths?

Understand what you have to offer with our in-depth personality test
Take the test

ENTP Weaknesses

Flightiness. That which is a strength can easily become a weakness and this is seen in the case of ENTPs and their idea-generating nature. While this can be the ENTP’s greatest strength, it can also mean that the ENTP may be flighty and flaky, jumping from one idea to the next and struggling to follow through. Their fear of missing out can make it hard to commit to one idea or one path; they want to keep exploring and evaluating.

Impracticality. ENTPs have a chaotic air about them that can range from amusing to aggravating, especially to coworkers and spouses. In their tendency to get caught up in their ideas they often lose sight of the immediate tasks around them such as house work, yard work and other responsibilities of daily living, such as paying bills. An ENTP may be stunningly brilliant but also poor, disorganized and seemingly untethered.

Breaking norms. Nonconformity, while it can be a positive trait, often gets the ENTP into trouble. Their entire approach to life is founded upon charting their own course, pushing the boundaries and doing things their way. While this leads to great creativity and advances in their fields, in can also put them at odds with authority figures and superiors, which can, in turn, hinder their progress and impede their success. “Incorrigible” and “stubborn” are two words that wouldn’t be out of place in describing a typical ENTP.

Procrastination. ENTPs are also known for their tendencies toward procrastination and poor time management. To some degree, this is a product of their Perceiving component in which they prefer to continue taking in information rather than making a decision and getting down to business. The issue is not necessarily laziness as much as it is a disinclination to stop the intake of ideas and information in order to move forward with one idea or one decision. They have a hard time prioritizing tasks and will struggle to keep new information and ideas from getting in the way of the work at hand.

ENTP Growth and Development

In order to reach their full potential, ENTPs should:

Do a little more research. ENTPs are quick to dive into new projects and ideas headfirst. While this enthusiastic “all in” quality can be a strength, it can also be detrimental when people of this type fail to do the due diligence or to pay adequate attention to the details. The ENTP can help avoid wasted time and money by stepping back and investigating first. 

Look at the “small picture.” As big-picture people and conceptual thinkers, people of this type are focused on the broad themes and patterns and the big, important projects, often letting the details fall by the wayside. However details—while nothing more than a bother to the ENTP—are often essential. ENTPs will do well to realize that details often end up eating more time in the long run if neglected or overlooked.

Learn to adapt to rules and structures. Rules aren’t actually made to be broken, contrary to the ENTP’s belief, and the people who follow them aren’t to be disdained as thoughtless or unintelligent. These boundaries provide order. If everyone disregarded them we’d be living in very different circumstances. ENTPs will get along better at work and in society if they can try to have a little respect for authority and follow the rules.

Stick to it. ENTPs generate so many different ideas and interesting options that they simply want to explore them all. While this can be an asset, it also can deter them from simply getting on with the work at hand. At some point, in order to be most productive, the ENTP needs to make a decision on a course of action, plot the steps to the finish and then just get going.

Differentiate between the possible and the probable. ENTPs often don’t properly distinguish between these two categories and thus find themselves spending a wealth of resources pursuing something that, though possible, is not at all probable. People of this type will do well to factor in the feasibility of various ideas when considering their many options. 

Primary tabs

Comments

Daniel (not verified) says...

Great profiling questions! Loved the verbiage.

Your name (not verified) says...

verbage ***

gloria northwood (not verified) says...

I assume that the person who said, "verbiage," slipped on the keyboard.

Calaen (not verified) says...

Boy have I had a passion for linguistics for as long as I can remember

People Call Me Dragon (not verified) says...

Same! I never knew why. Hmm...

SamW1180 (not verified) says...

Verbiage is indeed correct

Mb2524BB (not verified) says...

Holy crap folks...Look it up.  Verbiage absolutely correct.  Thank yoiu SamW1180!

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

Wordy works.

Rlk (not verified) says...

So we are verbiage debaters ... Ok get it

Lelei (not verified) says...

You are incorrect.  Verbiage is the correct spelling.

LJ Stroud (not verified) says...

This whole debate is garbiage!

Vine (not verified) says...

🤣 LMFAO 🤣

Bill Spellright (not verified) says...

Verbage and verbiage seem like two spellings of the same word. However, verbage is an error. ... Verbiage is the correct spelling of this word. It refers to excessive, intricate language.

Smarty Pants (not verified) says...

Both spellings are correct and acceptable.

Heime (not verified) says...

verbage

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

Verbiage. Solved by Merriam-Webster: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/verbiage

Kathleen K Brophy (not verified) says...

Verbage and verbiage seem like two spellings of the same word. However, verbage is an error. ... Verbiageis the correct spelling of this word. It refers to excessive, intricate language.

Peggy (not verified) says...

Verbiage.  Definitely a conversation amongst ENTP's...gotta love it.

Justin Erickson (not verified) says...

I totally love it.  I need to find another ENTP to hang out with because this conversation would drive my ESTJ wife crazy.

Guest (not verified) says...

First time in my adult life that I have taken the test, the first time I had I was barely a junior I high school. The results this time were smack in the middle between an ENFP and ENTP which is very accurate, as I feel most of the time I have a very strong emotional and expressive side, however when it comes to work and problem solving behavior I readily switch over to the methods most employed by ENTP. I also feel very lucky, as I believe that my partner of 5 years is also an ENTP therefore the tremendous overlap in behavior and similar ways of processing information especially in work situations lends itself to a very successful pairing. Thank you for offering this insight free of charge!

Guest (not verified) says...

I've also found myself smack dab in the middle of ENTP and ENFP and noticed that I make that switch depending on where I am. Furthermore, your post reminded me that I can actually readily contrOl that switch between ENTP and ENFP. I CHOOSE when I am emotional and empathetic and I CHOOSE when it is best to be analytical and practical. The trick, as I grow and mature further into my adulthood, is to choose the right times to employ each of these traits and to be sure that I am giving my best self to each situation I am in. I enjoy that I am fluid in terms of my T/F switch and it's a unique ability to be able to do that.

other Guest (not verified) says...

doesn't really work like that though. That's why people should check out cognitive functions. ENFPs and ENTPs have the same dominant and inferior function, but they switch on Thinking and Feeling. (ENFP= Fi-Te, ENTP= Ti-Fe)

Guest (not verified) says...

Yep. That is what I was going to say ... but it seems your comment has been overlooked ... Probably by ENFPs! :) :)

Nerd (not verified) says...

You are such a nerd "probably by ENFPs" get a life.

Guest (not verified) says...

Yes, Thank you for mentioning that. I totally agree. We are pulled between them.

Snolock says...

I had an interesting dilemma come up. I took a cognitive functions test after not having studied anything personality related in over a year. My results used to be ENTP, though I cant remember what my scores looked like, but now they consistently, across multiple tests, end up in this order: Ne>Ti>Te>Ni>Fe>Si>Se>Fi
Thinking back on it, when I was younger, prior to a lot of heavy abuse, I was rather pushy with my ideas and making other kids do things my way, extremely neat and tidy and was passionate about my schooling up until about 8th grade(all of this being common Te attitude) where I quit caring much at all. On the flip side of that, I was spent all of my free time reading books, playing games, watching my family play games, and watching the History Channel(which is more of an Ne attitude). This has me wondering if I used to be an ENTJ and flipped to an ENTP(they say it shouldn't happen, but if I was borderline even as a kid, it's more likely) and I'm now slowly going back, as I'm no longer in the abusive environment.

Guest (not verified) says...

I, too, am an ENTP/ENFP. I think being on the border of two types is less about switching back and forth between them as it is balance in those functions. The ENTP function breakdown is Ne, Ti, Fe, Si. Being on the border of T/F for an ENTP means that the Fe (extroverted feeling) function is very well developed. A mature adult has developed all functions with a decent command of each one's use. Personality comes from the order of development and comfort with each function. ENTPs and ENFPs both have Ne (extroverted intuition) as a dominant function, meaning it is the first to develop in childhood and continues to be the most comfortable (restful) function. I work in religious and therapeutic fields (chaplain, teacher), which means I use my feelings a lot at work. I find analyzing feelings and recognizing patterns in the imagination a lot more comfortable that gushy displays of affection. That's my preference for intuition over feeling. It's not about an ability to be empathetic or not. ENTPs can be very empathetic. It's just that we tend to be less comfortable or naturally talented at recognizing and navigating relationship dynamics, as they don't follow our Ti (thinking). Some ENTPs fear these dynamics so intensely that they never pay much attention to them. Others become obsessed with psychology. When we examine feelings in the abstract, we can build a framework for understanding how they serve to communicate our values to ourselves. Then we can learn to trust them. Some people just trust their feelings. Some folks trust their own feelings more than any information they receive from the outside or logical processes. These people are not ENTPs.

Elena Schneider (not verified) says...

"It's just that we (nntp's) tend to be less comfortable or naturally talented at recognizing and navigating relationship dynamics, as they don't follow our Ti (thinking). Some ENTPs fear these dynamics so intensely that they never pay much attention to them. Others become obsessed with psychology. When we examine feelings in the abstract, we can build a framework for understanding how they serve to communicate our values to ourselves." " Some people just trust their feelings. Some folks trust their own feelings more than any information they receive from the outside or logical processes. These people are not ENTPs."
Okay but why does it have to be one or the other?

Guest (not verified) says...

I agree that it doesn't have to be one way or the other. I am ENTP/ENFP and both hit the nail right on the head. Because I have a strong balance of logic and emotions. I use both in every situation. "What is the best logical solution that doesn't hurt anyone?" Is usually my thought process daily.

guest (not verified) says...

You missed exactly what OP was talking about though? The simple fact that you say "What is the best logical solution that doesn't hurt anyone?" is you acting like an ENTP. An ENFP wouldn't ask that, they would simply feel and act upon it. Feeling does not have to do with tapping in to your emotions. It has to do with the way you think. Instead of "what is the most logical solution", an ENFP would say "I don't want to hurt their feelings so I will act as such". YOU hit the nail on the head by saying you would put LOGIC before emotion (i.e. hurting someone).

Galavantagious says...

Everyone has the innate ability to be both of these simultaneously depending on the people that they're around and how they are with these people. do these people see you a certain way? do you want to keep that image? but then, where does the line start? At some point in time there has to be a marker or an impasse or some sort of obstacle to overcome. so... what makes what become what when it happens? figuring this out will help you decide whether you're more of an F cognitive function or T cognitive function user. Really they're both 2 sides of the same coin just one deals with people's opinions and the other deals with your opinion. Which to you is more important, the way other people are going to react to things, so you kind of create a do's and don'ts checklist type dealio to ravel out a fair solution that will satiate the masses to the best of your ability or the way that what you construe achieves the desired result regardless of how people react, "collateral damage,  I'll deal with the repercussions later"

h (not verified) says...

oof

Slstephan says...

Food for thought. I am 100% ENTP. I am emotional, but I don't just act on emotions, I think before I act. However, there is a constant battle between emotions and logic with me. I find that it's not that I ignore emotions, it's that I don't like them because they are illogical. Then, of course, I fight them and try to figure out a logical explanation of why I have them and what purpose they serve and end up at square one again - thinking that they're illogical nonsense. Needless to say, it causes much anxiety. 

ErikD (not verified) says...

ENTP here.  I have discovered as I get older that I'm having more emotional moments, triggered especially by music.  Having these experience has made me much more understanding of people who are driven more by feeling than logic.  These emotional moments have a life of their own, like surfing a wave, and it's pointless to try to shut them down with logic.  Why do they occur?  In the case of music, I find the phenomenon remarkable since it happens so reliably with certain songs.  The music acts as a key to an emotional terrain I rarely experienced when I was younger.  My logical mind is content to be better aware that this emotional pathway exists, even in me, and I do marvel at its power.

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

What started the emotional debate? I prefer the debate over the spelling of verbiage. At least, it has educational merit. 

Samantha (not verified) says...

SAME! I am essentially an ENTP-T, for I am driven to be great, sort of, well, a prankster, and quite objective in the workplace. Although I am essentially an ENTP, I also have the ability to switch between Thinking and Feeling. For me, it is usually hard to relate to the emotions of others (therefore I usually am uncomfortable when people depend on me to fix emotional situations), but I am still inclined to help because I know it is right. I also can tell whenever I am being insensitive, and I usually stop "spamming my thoughts" when I see someone is hurt. I think this ability to switch between Feeling and Thinking is due to an ENTP's ability to view things from multiple perspectives as well as their dominant Extroverted Intuition and Teritary Extraverted Feeling traits. With Extroverted Intuition, one sees how things COULD happen; therefore, they know when to put their objectivity to the side just in case of the reprecussions. And add that to teritary Extroverted Feeling, where one knows when emotions are essential in the outside world. I have also read another article on a different website that ENTPs can switch their personalities depending on who they are talking to; therefore, your Thinking/Feeling scenario makes sense.

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

Why would someone leave a comment on an NT page if they perceive NTs as insensitive? If someone can't handle the forest, why walk through the trees? 

A girl (not verified) says...

I'm an ENTP too, and you aren't the both, you didn't choose who you want to be, you only ignores the thinks of your functions, use it to think in another way, understand? I thought the same, that I was the both, but I released that what was occuring, if you be the both you would get in trouble too much to see it in this way, because your decisions of each personality would fight against your moment personality. It's like a P that is dedicated in School.

Abdo Esper says...

DUDE I'm also right in the middle of these two personalities, I identify a lot with both, and I have taken tests where they say I'm both. I've also noticed that I can change between these two personalities depending on my emotional stability. Do you have any advice (since we're the same) I'm a teen and I've realized these personality traits of mine.

Kevin Urban (not verified) says...

I'm the same.

Dr Schwartz (not verified) says...

If you took the Meyers-Briggs and used how you are at work to answer the questions, you probably got an inaccurate result. ENTP/ENFP are very close anyway, but you need to use examples from your personal life. The reason for this is that we are all forced to work outside our natural preferences in the work environment.
 

Ken M (not verified) says...

This makes a lot of sense to me.  Thank you for sharing your thoughts with us.  I’ve taken the test numerous times over the past couple of years. And surprisingly (at least to me, at first) my results flip flop between ENTP/ENFP.  And the only logical answer I could deduce was the  variation in my frame of reference while taking the tests.  It seems when my frame of reference was professionally, politically and/or economically/financially centered, the result would be ENTP.  However, when I was in a more relaxed mode (such as after being away from work and the news etc. for a period of time), it seems my frame of reference defaults to much more personal ideas and situations like my relationships with family and friends (i.e. more feeling related experiences). 

Callum (not verified) says...

Hey me too! And sometimes its so hard, you know. You want to talk to people on an emotional level and learn all about them and you also wanna talk about all of this cool and interesting technology or have detailed discussions and feel connected to people through that but it's so rare and hard to find for me. At least most of the time.

Guest (not verified) says...

I understand why people tend to think themselves as F/T, but I thought I would reply as a clarification even if people disagree. MBTI is based in Jung’s cognitive functions and every personality type uses both feeling and thinking functions. Just because you use both emotion and logic to make decisions doesn’t mean you flip between two different personality types; you are simply a healthy individual who has developed both your thinking function and your feeling function. This is significant with ENFPs versus ENTPs because their fundamental difference is the T and F functions. ENFPs use Fi and Te, whereas ENTPs use Ti and Fe. Study those functions and see which you prefer. Everyone uses all eight functions, but your MBTI type is determined by your top four preferences. And a healthy person will use all four of their most used functions with ease. Research it. It’s very interesting.

~A fellow member of the universe

Dogmum (not verified) says...

I am an ENTP female married to an ENFP male, (Yes I know it's the inverse of what's expected of our core personalities). I affectionately call my husband "the walking heart" as he wears it on his sleeve for all to see. The heart combined with his expansive natural ability to gravitate to those in need, leads him in all sorts of directions and sometimes he neglects his home life because he is so busy helping others (in his independent contracting business).

I myself I guess am gravitating to other intuitive types as I find sensing types too focussed on the "here and now" and sometimes to be overly materialistic. Yes it's very true, I do have little patience for those who I don't perceive as competent or smart. I do however love to share my knowledge and help others (my husband has taught me to get in touch with my "feelings" although I think they were buried VERY deep).

Thank you for this insightful and quite interesting analysis, it's quite true I must agree. . . .

Carmenjello (not verified) says...

That's cool bro.

Guest (not verified) says...

How did your husband (ENFP) get you (ENTP) to learn how to get in touch with your feelings? I have a friend who is a ENTP and I'm a ENFP, and im trying to figure out how I can allow the space for him to open up?? It doesn't work when I ask him...

Guest ENTP (not verified) says...

ENTPs don't like to touch their feelings too much. You see, imagine you have a table with all the possible weapons. In a corner, almost falling out of the table there is this knife who looks plain, a knife indeed, but plain. Those are the feelings for an ENTP, they rather leave them there, not being touched, or used, or molested, no matter how powerful they might be. We might come off as insensible but the fact that ENTPs rarely open up and when they do it's a very antithetical talk with ourselves that you are invited to listen to, it's true. Show him you are there mentally, and he will appreciate that more than just standing there, challenge him and show him he is "wrong", you'll see how fast you get on his favorites.

Guest (not verified) says...

ENTPs are in touch with their feelings, they just don't discuss them. IF they try to explain their feelings it almost never or hardly makes sense to another person.You'll always hear that ENTPs are difficult to understand which is true but it's because of their lack of expression when it comes to discussing feelings. It doesn't mean that they can't feel or they seclude personal emotions, it's the problem of communication. ENTPs have complex trail of thoughts and to understand them, is difficult in any language. This is all "generic emotion talk" however. I'm an ENTP female and if there is something specifically bothering me, e.g.my sister is lying to me for whatever the reason, I'll be straightforward and confront her. On the other hand if I had to discuss how I cope when i'm scared for example is a different matter. I won't do it, because my sentences won't make sense and/or I won't find the right words. It's frustrating really.

-soooo is this only me or like other ENTPs because I'm sure this is quite common in ENTP personality types. //

Taryn (not verified) says...

Deifinately not just you. You are not alone. I am also ENTP, and I can't/won't talk about feelings, I have tried a few times, and it comes out all wrong, and difficult to understand. So I usually just say "It's too hard to explain", then just leave it at that. I have enjoyed reading your comments, as my most recent ex is a ENFP, and in some ways we were completely connected. When it came to empathy, patience, and feelings. We were on completely different pages. I don't know if it's just me or a general ENTP thing, but I find it really difficult to get into a realtionship. I mean I have no issues, dating, and seeing someone for say a few months, but as soon as I am faced with having to actually commit, I run a mile, because I just never feel anything is good enough, I obsess over the flaws in a prospective partner rather than the good things.

Is it just me, or is that an ENTP trait?

Share your thoughts

Truity up to date