ENFP
Choose other type

Primary tabs

ENFP Strengths

Excellent communicators. ENFPs have outstanding communication skills and they know how to use them. They will engage anyone in conversation at the drop of a hat, and they know how to draw others out in a way that keeps the discussion flowing. Whether casually shooting the breeze or collaborating in the workplace, ENFPs provide the horsepower that keeps the engine of conversation humming along. 

Imaginative. ENFPs are imaginative problem solvers and reject the idea that traditional ways are always the best. In every situation they believe an original approach is possible—and desirable—and they refuse to become prisoners of habit or routine. They see roadblocks as opportunities, and they confront every challenge they face with fresh eyes and no preconceived notions. 

Natural leaders. ENFPs step forward to assume positions of leadership readily and instinctively. They are confident in their ability to handle demanding responsibilities many people find scary or intimidating. ENFP leaders are consensus builders who work hard to gain the trust of their associates, patiently listening to their ideas and reacting enthusiastically to their good suggestions. Their assertive, “can-do” attitude inspires others and motivates them to action.

Strong social conscience. Often active in social movements, ENFPs stand up for what they believe in without apology. Some people talk the compassion game but don’t follow through with meaningful action, but ENFPs believe it is vitally important to back up caring words with good deeds. Despite their friendly nature, an ENFP will go supernova with righteous anger when they are exposed to suffering and injustice. They can get quite loud and assertive, if that’s what it takes to get their opinions heard.

What are your ENFP strengths?

Understand what you have to offer with our in-depth personality test
Take the test

ENFP Weaknesses

Hypersensitivity. ENFPs sometimes let their imaginations run wild and often perceive bad intentions that don’t really exist. Being hyper-alert and aware helps ENFPs improve their social comprehension, but reading between the lines only works when something is actually hidden there. If it isn’t, misunderstandings can occur and hurt feelings can damage good relationships.

Lack of focus and follow through. ENFPs are endlessly creative, capable of filling a thousand days with a thousand bold ideas. But they don’t always follow through on their inspirations, and if others are not brought on board to handle the details, their best ideas may never be put into practice. ENFPs rely on their initial excitement and passion too much and don’t always show the discipline necessary to translate their ideas into real-world production. They have a tendency to start new projects before the last ones are finished, and failing to see things through is where ENFPs sometimes come up short. 

Overthink things. ENFPs have a tendency to perceive slights, resentments or hostility where none actually exist, and their habit of overanalyzing other people’s behavior can lead to unnecessary anger and conflict. If ENFPs aren’t receiving as many compliments as they expect from their significant others, their insecurities can be activated and they may start to feel unappreciated and unloved. 

Overemotional and approval-seeking. While emotional expression is a core part of the ENFP's identity, they can come on too strong. The bubbly, energetic style of ENFPs doesn’t mesh well with every partner and introverts, in particular, can sometimes feel steamrolled in their presence. ENFPs are also approval-seekers, and in their desire to receive praise and acknowledgment they may try a little too hard to make a good impression, talking too much and listening too little in the process. 

ENFP Growth and Development

In order to reach their full potential, ENFPs should:

Accept the fact that if it looks like a duck, swims like a duck and quacks like a duck ... ENFPs are intuitive and have a sharp eye for detail. They make a mistake, however, when they insist on looking for hidden motivations or covert agendas everywhere. In normal social encounters, ENFPs should make a real effort to give everyone the benefit of the doubt and take words and actions at face value. Assuming the worst can be a self-fulfilling prophecy, since people will eventually sense an ENFP’s mistrust and return it in kind. 

Take the foot off the accelerator. In social situations, that is. When ENFPs are tempted to turn on the charm just a bit more, or pick up the intensity in their presentation style, they would be wise to resist those urges. Smiling and nodding and listening are excellent communication tools. Interestingly, because they are so good with words, ENFPs actually need fewer of them to make their points or establish solid human connections in most instances. 

Don’t shirk the “dirty” work. ENFPs don’t always see projects through to the end, preferring to hop from one endeavor to another like a hungry hummingbird flitting through a juicy flower patch. So every once in a while, as a change of pace, ENFPs should make it a point to maintain tight control all the way to the finish. Detail work and project management do not always come naturally to ENFPs. But they have the insight and know-how to handle all the small stuff, if they just make the decision to put their noses to the grindstone and keep them there until the process is complete.

Look inside for validation. ENFPs enjoy compliments and try very hard to please, and this has a subtle, and not entirely positive, effect on their behavior. When ENFPs pay too much attention to the opinions of others, it can prevent them from following their own instincts and leave them open to manipulation. “If being true to myself gets me in hot water, then so be it”—that is what ENFPs should tell themselves when they start worrying too much about what other people think. 

Find good partners. Because they are a little lax with the details, ENFPs need assistants and co-workers who can handle the duties they tend to overlook. ENFPs enjoy working in teams so it should not be a big stretch to form relationships or partnerships with people whose skills complement their own. In their personal lives, ENFPs can also benefit by making connections with those who are good at the aspects of life they neglect. This could certainly be said about any of us, but ENFPs have a strong independent streak and may not reach out to others for help as often as they should.

Primary tabs

Comments

Guest (not verified) says...

I was undetermined in S-N and T-F. When I reviewed the 4 personality types that were presented, I could relate to all 4 to varying degrees, finding I most strongly related to the ENFP. Another survey gave me results in the ISFP and INFP personalities. I relate quite strongly to those as well; however the Champion ENFP is definitily most spot on.

isaaccrooks15 says...

I guess you know exactly what you are.

Guest (not verified) says...

I was also undetermined. However, I personally am an ENFP. Isn't it fun to be undetermined?

Guest (not verified) says...

YES

Guest (not verified) says...

you could be an ambivert, which could be messing up the personality test. as an ambivert myself, I tend to not focus on the first letter, but the last 3 letters and relate to those instead

Guest (not verified) says...

What if the only thing that I got for sure was E and the rest was all borderline?

Weston (not verified) says...

me too

 

Tyi (not verified) says...

ENFPs are noted to be among the most introverted extroverts. We are definitely Ambiverts. Also INFJs are among the most extroverted introverts

Serenity says...

Now that really makes sense!! I'm an ENFP-T (I totally relate with being an ambivert)

Guest (not verified) says...

wait what

dez (not verified) says...

This totally makes sense. As an ENFP, I know i'm imtroverted but has a slight extroverted spirit that kinda resonates more when i'm doing what I enjoy

CPA (not verified) says...

yes

MJ Farina (not verified) says...

YES! That makes sense!!! Because I think Im definitly a combination of both. Sometimes more introverted, sometimes more extroverted.  

Perola (not verified) says...

OMG ME TOO!!!

Guest (not verified) says...

I knew from the get go I was an ENFP although the E always kinda confused me. People always told me I was outgoing and I liked to be around people but I never felt I really was "extroverted". Turns out that ENFP's are actually really introverted extroverts!I read somewhere we're more introverted than most extroverts. Would make sense to me, I liek being around people ( if I can pull myself out of my house to be with other people) but it DRAINS me for weeks.

Lin F W (not verified) says...

I totally agree with being an introvert extrovert.

Guest (not verified) says...

which one?

Guest (not verified) says...

Yes! That's so me. My husband thinks it's the strangest damn thing that I'll be like "let's do this and that and see these people this day" and then when it's time to actually do it I'm looking for every reason I can find to bail on my own idea and stay home. I like people, I'm great around people and connect easily with others. but I also get very easily exhausted by too much interaction, almost like I'm overstimulated. And once I'm ready to be done being social, I'm done RIGHT NOW. Time to go, no more people today,
Please.

Guest (not verified) says...

You are speaking from the bottom of my some times misunderstood heart! Thank you! My friends found it really weird that I am always up for whatever, super spontaneous and mostly in a good mood, but when it come to actually going out that day.. I will be sort of reluctant and after I do go social (which is fun, until I've had enough). Every other week, after a lot of "social obligations" and just want to recharge and be alone, not even boyfriend allowed.

Lori Thompson (not verified) says...

So totally me! Party? Yes, I'll come. I can't wait....

(day of party)I've already been around enough people today, and I just need down time. I think I'll just stay home....

newtide says...

I can so relate to this!

Brett Widmann (not verified) says...

This is definitely me, too! I get so drained after a few nights out that I need some time to recover. I use my social time for inspiration and to learn more about other people and their experiences. I work from home and for myself, so when I need to recharge, getting lost in my work at home truly helps. It's a good balance for someone like me and I am glad there are others out there who feel and experience introverted extraversion as I do. :D :D

Catelin07 says...

That's so true but I wouldn't say I was exhausted I would say I had my fill of people for the day. Also they had a point about coming off as a open book but when it comes to my actual personal feelings I prefer to keep it to myself.

 

Sarah W (not verified) says...

What do you do for work? I recently graduated college and working for myself and from home would be a dream come true but seems impossible. 

Brett Widmann (not verified) says...

I am a web developer and specialize in Wordpress and frontend development.

It was a challenge at first, but after working with the right people, I'm doing quite well. It took about 3-6 months for things to take off for me, and a little bit of personal branding and directional change on my LinkedIn Profile.

There's still a lot I could do to further myself, but I'm already content with the amount of work I have.

Brooke M (not verified) says...

I am a real estate agent. It gives me a nice balance of being around people and getting my alone time.  I used to be completely extroverted and didn't have many waking minutes without people around me. My roommate and I would even fall asleep talking to each other in college...in high school it would be a friend on the phone until I was literally about to pass out...before that it was one of my parent's would stay in my room with me till I passed out because otherwise I'd fall asleep on the couch just so I could be in the same room with someone. Now...I am THRILLED to have ME time. It just took getting married and having children to want some time by myself!!! I love doing real estate because I do about 50% of my work at home, at the office or somewhere on my own. Whether it is doing comparative market analysis, looking for properties for clients, preparing clients files for showings and listings, writing contracts, following up with various people for each of the transactions I'm working on, etc. About 30% of my time is actually with clients showing homes or doing listing appointments. The other 20% is spent on meetings, training, workshops, continuing education, etc. I have had to learn time management and some discipline for getting tasks done on time, but it has come more and more naturally.  I am personally loving it and I'm more fulfilled in this career than anything I've done in the past. 

Akshay Singh (not verified) says...

Hey Sarah! Same here, I left my job to begin freelance writing career. But you need to put in a lot of work to get paid and income is also fluctuating. Besides working from home, I would suggest you to give tutions on any subject you are good at. You will feel fulfilled.😊

Leila (not verified) says...

I'm the same! I absolutely love organising and planning events and meet ups and work myself up to the day but when the day comes I just want it to pass already. I mean, it's not that I don't have fun, I always have fun. I'd be bursting with energy, on a high, but what I look forward to most is for the day to end and return to the sanctuary of my own home. We're just all a little paradox, aren't we?

Aidia Alford (not verified) says...

I can agree. My friends like to call me a "situational extrovert", meaning I do enjoy smaller social gatherings and parties, but only when I know a good handfull of the people there, and even then I find myself needing some significant alone time afterwards! I always thought I was weird and unrelatable for it until now! :)

Ben F (not verified) says...

This makes sense to me. I've always been confused on where I stood with the E/I area. My problem is that I feed on other peoples' energy. Positive energy gets me pumped, but negative energy drains me. I could go somewhere and be around a bunch of dull or negative people, or people I just have nothing in common with and get exhausted, then say "well, I'm gonna head out." Then on my way to the door I run into someone that energizes me and I can be kept talking for another 30 minutes. I also find that overly exraverted people drain me but overly introverted people drain me as well. I also think because we ENFP's are fairly independent we get used to doing things on our own, and if people are around that are keeping us from doing the things we prefer to do, or they are ruining the experience, we'd prefer just to be left alone. I also prefer being around a group of people I know really well and doing low-key but still enjoyable activities as opposed to going to loud, bustling parties. We really are a very complex group, but I like that I don't have everything about myself figured out; it keeps life interesting as I keep discovering more about myself.

Aidia Alford (not verified) says...

I can totaly relate on the feeding on other's feelings and attitudes. This part gets dangerous as it depends highly on how others feel, sometimes how they feel about me. I continuously have to stop and remind myself that my self-worth does not depend on other's view of me. This can be difficult to remember, especially in our culture today with social media and being in constant contact with others. One can find themself caught in the comparison trap that ensnares so many people today, causing friend struggles, ostracism, and depression. ENFP's also tend to be very deep thinkers. This can sometimes translate to over thinking.We must me mindful and be able to pin point fallacies in our own thinking. We also must be sure not be too fickle in our moods and mindsets. For instance, if I'm not doing much or am involved in an activity that does not require much effor or brain power, my mood is easily changed. If someone were to come up to me in a grouchy mood or says something snarky, my mood would tend to reflect it. All in all, I've found that unless I'm busy or have a tight schedule, my thouhgts and moods are easily changed an affected by those around me.

Tonja says...

Too funny... This is so me!  

Mrs. Riley (not verified) says...

You've described me to a 'T'.

WOTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT (not verified) says...

WOTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT MRRRRRRRSSSSSSSSS RILEYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY

Ini (not verified) says...

😂😂😂

I can relate with this.

Peace (not verified) says...

Yes!!! Makes sense about the introverted extrovert and I’m also shy, but outgoing😎

Leigh King (not verified) says...

I have also been a little confused on this same issue of being extroverted, in the sense that I tend to "appear" to be an open book. But, when it's "My" deepest feelings and thoughts being scrutinized by others, I am instantly, very Introverted. I Love being with other people but I value my long periods of being alone and not having to feel obligated to entertain, or even talk to people for lengthy periods of time. After being with other people, I feel like I need to recharge, by being in ... My Zone.

Arielle (not verified) says...

Yes!! That's exactly the way we ENFP's operate throughout our personal lives. We love interacting with others but later we begin to feel like we just need a break. We are self-reliant and very independent. It is hard for us to allow someone else to make decisions for us or boss us around that's why we all have an entrepreneurial spirit. Our deepest aspirations are those that involve creativity and self expression. We like exploring others but we hate being responsible for others. We just have that "thing" a special spark of charisma and awesome interpersonal skills. People love us but it is hard for us to open up at first unless we feel we are around people who share the same interests or have similar characteristics. Our friends tend to be very supportive and understanding. We need that encouragement from friends to know that we are doing the right things. If anyone is
against us, we see it as competition. And yes...we will win! Always come to slay and never last at opportunity.

Guest (not verified) says...

As an ENFP I have found that while I know many people, and most people that know me comment on how I seem to know everyone, there are few people I would describe as being a close friend. I would actually like to have more close friends but this has not been the case throughout my entire life and I am 59 years old. I also plan to do things with people and then when the event approaches and I am not in the mood, I find myself trying to get out of the commitment if it isn't going to put other people in a bind if I don't participate. A few months ago I paid $55 for a concert that I was going to attend with 4 other people. I found out that they were going to get to the venue 3 hours early and this was NOT general admission seating! Someone else in the group who lives in a different town had my ticket so if I was going I had to meet the group 3 hours before the concert. Since I had already paid and there were others going, I opted to stay home, lose the $ I had paid for the ticket so I would not have to sit for 3 hours waiting.

Guest (not verified) says...

I did the same thing for a new movie coming out, although I am INFP. I found out late that friends were getting to the theatre like six hours early and I couldn't handle waiting that long in a line, it sounded like torture. One of them had my ticket and would not save me a seat so I just didn't go!

Tammy (not verified) says...

I agree with EVERY single word in your comment. I couldnt have said it better myself, thats rare.

Emily Grace (not verified) says...

This may have a bit more to do with thefp part of the enfp personality type, I tested on the border of both of those and have found that I can get better at shutting off the sponge like tendancies of the f, and getting quicker at reading people and making quick decisions to set boundaries that I could see being more of a j trait... If I could say anything to fellow fpers it would be trust your instincts more and maybe make a list before you go out of things you perceive in social settings that brings your mood down. Then when you feel that feeling direct your body and thereby your energy receiver away from it, keep your energy sacred for the work you need and want to do, and you'll be able to enjoy being an extrovert more. At least we are abstract thinking people so we're not totally screwed!

introvertedextrovert (not verified) says...

OMG this makes soooo much sense as to why I keep deactivating my FB accounts or at some point deleting them. At first I was confused if I was ashamed of myself or trying to hide something -- but hearing you say " in the sense that I tend to "appear" to be an open book. But, when it's "My" deepest feelings and thoughts being scrutinized by others, I am instantly, very Introverted." --- it makes sooo much sense! I was hating on myself for not being able to just chill with Facebook since it seems like such an easy thing to deal with. Why was I putting so much energy into it?? Why did I feel like my privacy was invaded even by the fact that sometimes I don't even post anything on it, but the mere fact that people can see who my friends are stresses me out?? 

Also, it makes sense why I feel the need to deactivate and trim my list down to 100 friends -- it's because i get super drained just by being out there even if I don't comment on anything! So much empathy sensors are on full blast just being on FB and it drains me to just be on it. 

Somebody else please offer some insights into this!! Thank you.

Javier (not verified) says...

Been there, done that.

Happy sad guy (not verified) says...

Ha! I delete my FB account at least twice a month.  Also I throw parties every time I'm home....till I get overwhelmed; then around 11, I " slip off to the restroom"  now, my friends just laugh and tell me good night, stay at the house and party till the late hours.

SpunkyBuns says...

I'm reluctant to make new friends, don't trust easily, and careful about who I let into my inner circle. With good reason though. I cannot care halfway, commit halfway, or maintain firm boundaries/protections against being taken advantage of. I only have room for relationships that add more to my quality of life than they take from it. Once someone matters to me, they matter like family, and I share my whole self. 

I imagine this approach might seem stuck up or something in more superficial, self-absorbed types, but for us it is actually the wisest way to ensure that we AND others are treated the way we need and deserve to be, without getting tangled up in the inevitable problems, crises, struggles, and other deep personal matters of people we are not meaningfully connected with.

Being so careful about who is and isn't allowed into our safe, trusted, inner circle is really the only point where we CAN protect ourselves. Once they're in and we care, we're loyal to a fault - them before us even.

Given all that... yeah, ANYBODY gaining more access to our personal information or private life than we allowed feels like a HUGE violation. It also puts us in the terrible situation of feeling compelled to pull waaaay back and self-protect, but reluctant to give up what we tbought was a safe way to meet some of our need for connection. If only respect was truly valued and honored...

Hope that gives some validation. 

Guest (not verified) says...

Omg relatable 100; also, enfp here!

Luke Henkel says...

This was one of my biggest struggles through college and even a bit after I graduated!  I just couldn't handle it, for all the reasons you mentioned and then some.  Even the existence of my Facebook was a stressor, especially when I was feeling "drained" like so many of you have mentioned, and in need of alone time.  If I felt overwhelmed and wanted to disappear into my own world/zone, I would start thinking about deleting my FB account almost instantly!  Funny... I'm so glad I'm not the only one!

Julie Perry (not verified) says...

Oh my goodness, EVERYTHING you just said is me too.  I have done exactly all of those things, and now am not on facebook at all.  Perfectly said!

Mr Side Attraction (not verified) says...

I wish i could like this comment.. and like the first two replies as well. I am just like it says, Enthusiastic more than Extroverted. I actually tell people that I'm an introvert who is Outgoing, they get all puzzled like i just built castles in the air. Oh well. Who knows? ....an ENFP knows.

Share your thoughts

Truity up to date