Your Enneagram Type & Your Financial Habits

Category: Enneagram

We surveyed 58,000 people and here’s what we learned about how your type predicts your spending style. 

 

Your personality can inform everything from your political affiliation to your relationships, so it’s probably no surprise that your Enneagram type plays a role in how you may manage your finances. 

Some Enneagram types are not motivated by money at all, while others see it as deeply important in their lives. Some types are driven to save, but not all for the same reasons. And still, every type funnels money into different spending categories -- from experiences to streaming, and everything in between. 

After surveying over 58,000 Truity users on their financial habits, we found some interesting links between Enneagram type and financial habits. 

Financial Trends by Enneagram Type

Enneagram Types 1, 5 & 6: Most likely to stress about having enough money for the future 

Most types claimed their biggest financial stressor was spending money when they knew they shouldn’t, but three types reported another response. Ones, Fives and Sixes were more likely to worry about having enough money to fund their futures. According to Molly Owens, Founder and CEO of Truity, this same fear likely stems from unique sources within each type. 

Rule-following Ones are probably more inclined to fear not being responsible enough with their finances. Fives often fear they won’t have enough resources, which may drive this fear of not being able to sustain themselves. Lastly, Sixes likely view money as a component of security, which is why they fear they won’t have enough of it. 

Enneagram 3: Most likely to report they were “very motivated” by money

Type Threes, the Achievers, were the most likely to report they were “very motivated” by money, with 41% claiming it was an important driver of their decision-making. Intensely focused on obtaining success, it’s no shock their salary and savings is one way Threes choose to define accomplishment. 

Enneagram 4: Most likely to report they were not motivated by money at all

Money isn’t everything, but it does help us do more -- so we weren’t surprised that most types said they were at least somewhat motivated to make money. The type that was most likely to say they weren’t motivated at all to earn? Fours. The Individualists are not materialistic, and are perhaps more comfortable defining themselves by their uniqueness and not their paychecks.

Enneagram 5: 23% splurged the most on media like streaming and gaming

Whereas most types spent the most discretionary cash on things like clothing, travel and dining, Fives stood out. Perhaps unsurprisingly, this introverted type spent most of their extra money on media, like music, streaming and gaming. 

Enneagram 7: 44% said they were happiest about “experience” purchases

Every other type besides Sevens said they were most happy with purchases they made that were “useful.” True to their personality as adventurers, Sevens claimed “experience” purchases were their best use of funds. 

In case you’re interested in your personal profile, here’s the full breakdown of financial habits for each type. 

Enneagram One 

Ones have a propensity to save versus spend, and want to make sure they have enough money for the future.

  • Most likely to say they save what they earn and rarely spend. Owens projects the One’s drive to “do the right thing” prompts them to save for a rainy day instead of buying themselves a new toy.
  • When they treat themselves, Ones spend the most on travel and clothing, but are also the type most likely to spend on fitness and wellness—perhaps an indicator of their desire to keep their bodies and minds in good working order. 
  • Most types said their biggest money stressor was spending too much when they shouldn’t. This wasn’t the biggest worry for Ones, however— 33% stressed most about having enough for future goals like retirement or their kids’ college. 

Enneagram Two

Twos aren’t likely to be interested in money for money’s sake, says Owens. “They may think of money as a way to care for loved ones or create opportunities to connect, rather than a goal in itself,” she explains. 

  • Twos’ incomes tended towards the lower end of the range, with 52% of Twos aged 30-50 reporting incomes below $50k. 
  • Only 24% of Twos say money is a “very important” motivator for them, the second least of all the types.
  • One of the types most likely to say they spend what they earn, and don’t save much; 20% classify themselves as true spenders (vs. savers or a mix of both). This may be because Twos are often the family caretakers, and likely to be in charge of spending for the whole family unit, says Owens. 
  • When they treat themselves, Twos spend the most discretionary cash on clothing and dining.

Enneagram Three 

Enneagram Threes are often high earners, who see money as a “very important” driver in everything they do. Threes are often concerned with status and outward appearance.

  • One of the two types with the most high-earners; 7% of Threes report making over $150,000 a year, and another 8% report making over $100,000 per year. 
  • When they treat themselves, image-conscious Threes spend the most on clothing, followed by travel.
  • More so than any other type, Threes list money as a “very important” motivator in their decision-making; 41% said that finances are a major driver for them. 
  • Threes were more likely than any other type to say “luxury” purchases make them happy. 

Enneagram Four 

Though they are the type most likely to say that money isn’t a motivating factor in their decision-making, Fours fell among the spenders of the Enneagram. “Fours may be more guided by their emotions in managing money, spending on the things that appeal to them instead of budgeting or being disciplined,” says Owens.

  • One of the types most likely to say they spend what they earn, and don’t save much, 24% of Fours self-reported as spenders. 
  • When they treat themselves, Fours spend the most on clothing, followed closely by media and hobbies.
  • Fours were the most likely of all the types to say money does not motivate them, apart from meeting basic needs. 

Enneagram Five

Despite being one of the types most likely to self-identify as savers, Fives also tend to stress about not having enough money for the future. Ever the rational type, they prize being capable and self-reliant, and finances may be one key way they measure that. 

  • One of the types most likely to say they save what they earn and rarely spend; 27% of Fives self-reported as real savers. Owens suggests the rational, minimalist Five may not see the need for extravagant purchases.
  • When they treat themselves, Fives spend the most on media—music, books, streaming, and video games. 
  • Most types said their biggest money stressor was spending too much when they shouldn’t. However, 30% of Fives worried they wouldn’t have enough for future goals like retirement or their kids’ college. “This may be due to their fundamental  anxiety about not having enough resources,” says Owens. 

Enneagram Six

Owens wasn’t surprised to see Sixes stress more about the future than most other types, hypothesizing the anxious Six may worry they won’t have security in the future if they don’t save enough today.

  • When they treat themselves, Sixes spend the most clothing and dining. 
  • Most types said their biggest money stressor was spending too much when they shouldn’t. However, Sixes stressed more about the future, with 31% worried they wouldn’t have enough for goals like retirement or their kids’ college. 
  • 38% of Sixes listed money as a “very important” motivator; only more Threes said the same. "Where Threes are likely to focus on money as a metric of success, Sixes are probably more focused on the security aspect of having enough in the bank," says Owens. 

Enneagram Seven

Sevens are the adventurers of the Enneagram, so it makes total sense they spend a lot on travel—and they’ve been very pleased with those purchases. Sevens also self-identify as spenders. “Sevens are a little more impulsive,” says Owens. “They see a purchase they know can bring them happiness or fun, and feel FOMO if they don’t get it.” 

  • One of the types most likely to say they spend what they earn, and don’t save much; 21% classified themselves as spenders vs. savers or a bit of both.
  • When they treat themselves, true to type, Sevens spend the most discretionary dollars on travel and adventure. 
  • All the types say they’ve been most pleased by “useful” purchases they’ve made in the past—except Sevens. More Sevens said “experience”  purchases—travel, events, and so on—have been the most satisfying use of their money.

Enneagram Eight

Enneagram Eights tend to be high earners, who are fairly motivated by money. Although Eights aren’t stereotypically image-conscious, they do seek power and control. Owens thinks financial status could be a symbol of power and influence for the Eight—a way to show that they’re on top.  Plus, assertive Eights are likely to prevail in any negotiation about money—meaning higher salaries and better deals. 

  • One of the two types with the most high-earners; 7% report making over $150,000 a year, and another 7% report making over $100,000 per year. 
  • When they treat themselves, Eights spend the most on travel and clothing.
  • Among the types most likely to say money is a “very important” motivator.

Enneagram Nine

"Laid-back Nines may see money as just a means to an end, motivated to have just enough of it to keep life on an even keel," says Owens. "Nines aren’t much for showing off or putting themselves out to gain acclaim, and their attitude towards money follows suit."

  • Nines are the least likely of all the types to say money is a “very important” motivator in their lives. 
  • Like several of the types, Nines feel happiest about useful purchases, but these kind, selfless folks also name gifts as an expenditure that brings them joy. 
  • When they treat themselves, Nines spend the most on clothing and dining, but also name hobbies and media as major expenditure categories. 
  • Nines show little interest in the trappings of wealth; 56% say they define being “wealthy” as simply having what they need.
  • Nines are one of the types that are least likely to appear in the $150k+ income bracket, with only 4% falling into this category.
Jenna Birch

Jenna Birch is a content and brand strategist for startups, entrepreneurs and VCs. Before moving into consulting, she was a prolific journalist for national magazines and websites, and author of The Love Gap: A Radical Plan to Win in Life & Love (Grand Central Publishing). Her work has been published in The Washington Post, Vogue, Cosmopolitan, Marie Claire, Harper's Bazaar, InStyle, HuffPost, and more. She lives in Ann Arbor, MI with her EXTP fiancé and the best pup around, Ollie.

Comments

Ejike (not verified) says...

Great research. I totally agree with this.

Robert Campbell (not verified) says...

I do stress about money as a 5. Maybe that's avarice.

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