How to Develop the Weaker Parts of Your Personality (Hint: It’s a Process, Not a Preference)

One of the great things about personality type is it tells you what you aren't very good at. 

When we talk about personal growth, we often focus on strengths. Investing in developing what we are already good at. And this is a good strategy: if you are naturally good at public speaking, investing in understanding what makes a great speech is a brilliant idea. 

Does your personality type determine your politics?

Does your personality type predict your politics? A Truity survey of 25,223 individuals this month appears to confirm just that. While much has been made about the various factors driving increases in U.S. political partisanship, from social media bubbles to campaign tactics, this survey of those who took our Typefinder test (based on the theories of Myers and Briggs) shows that your underlying personality type may play a big role in determining your political affiliation. 

Do You Make Decisions Through your Belly, Heart or Head?

The Enneagram is one of many personality systems that seek to classify our character or type. As a diagrammatic structure, it’s a 3 x 3 arrangement with each of the nine Enneagram Types placed into one of three 'triads' or 'centers of intelligence': the Instinctive Center, the Feeling Center and the Thinking Center. 

Belly, heart and head people exist — and which triad you belong to can tell you much about how you filter your everyday experiences. 

Are Free Personality Tests Worth Your Time?

Free personality quizzes have become increasingly popular, but why are people so fascinated by them? Why do we use these tests to answer our most important questions and steer our lives when they may not be scientifically valid? These tests seem to hover somewhere between science and entertainment, with the promise to offer insights into who we really are. But perhaps they’re not what they appear to be.

Why We Can All Develop Even Blends of Extraversion and Introversion

Ambiverts have contemplative ideas like an Introvert and also possess the ability to sell or implement those ideas in a competitive environment like an Extravert. This ability to ‘flex’ with the situation is widely valued in society. Known as the ambivert’s advantage, even blends of extraversion and introversion are in demand in the workplace and in personal spheres. As a result, ambiverts tend to find greater opportunities in their relationships and careers than people who sit at the more extreme ends of the personality spectrum.

How Your Personality Type Impacts Your Income

You're probably well aware that your income depends on how much education and experience you have. You may have thought about how much more you might earn by moving to a hotter labor market or changing industries. But there's a big piece of your earning power you may be overlooking—your personality type. Those traits you were born with can impact your earnings more than you may expect.

Want a Higher Income? Find a Job that Fits Your Personality

Does the phrase “I earn a good salary, but I want to be in a job that I truly love” sound familiar? How about, “I work in a nice place, but the pay is really bad?” If you’ve ever felt unfulfilled or underpaid, take heart. Because as it turns out, experts say that your personality is the key to getting the career and the money you want.

How A Personality Test is Made

If you’ve taken any number of personality tests online, at some point you’ve probably wondered what’s going on under the hood. Who writes these tests? What sort of qualifications do they have? And how accurate are these things, really?

THE FINE PRINT: Myers-Briggs® and MBTI® are registered trademarks of the MBTI Trust, Inc., which has no affiliation with this site. Truity offers a free personality test based on Myers and Briggs' types, but does not offer the official MBTI® assessment. For more information on the Myers Briggs Type Indicator® assessment, please go here.

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