Are ISTP and ISTP personality types compatible? See how ISTPs and ISTPs get along in this guide to ISTP/ISTP relationships. If you're an ISTP in a relationship with an ISTP, discover how you'll communicate, interact, and relate to each other in daily life.

How ISTP and ISTP Get Along

ISTPs and ISTPs have some common themes that often arise when they get to know each other. As an ISTP, you'll want to keep these issues in mind when you get to know an ISTP.

As a Sensing Perceiver type, your approach to relationships is perhaps the most straightforward of all the types—you look for connections with people who are up for joining you on all of life's adventures. You may tend to gravitate towards people with a similar background to yours, but you just as easily accept people from all walks of life, so long as you can enjoy your time together. You especially value relationships with people who share your hobbies and interests and a can-do approach to life.

Your counterpart is a Sensing Perceiver type, which means their core focus is enjoying the moment. In relationships, this means that they look for people that they have an easy synergy with, and often prioritize one thing: FUN. As an SP type, your counterpart doesn't think too hard about whether they connect with other people on a deep level. They're simply looking for companions to keep them company on this crazy ride called life.

The two of you share a casual, spontaneous approach to life and and interest in enjoying the moment. You both like to experience the world rather than analyze it, and you’ll probably bond when you discover the things you like to do together. 

Communication Between ISTP and ISTP

Communication can be a challenge between any two people, and communication between ISTP and ISTP personality types is not the exception. By being aware of the issues that often arise when ISTPs and ISTPs communicate, you can learn how to reach an understanding more quickly.

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ISTP vs. ISTP Values

Values are intensely personal, and while an ISTP and an ISTP can find common ground, there will always be some differences in what you hold dear. However, understand how your ISTP approach to values compares with your ISTP counterpart's will help you to appreciate and overcome your differences.

The two of you are life’s natural ‘fixers’ and you share a strong belief in the importance of pragmatism and logic. Both of you tend to feel that getting things done and honoring your commitments is the highest possible goal. You both value look for the practical solution to problems, embrace responsibility, and seek to be competent in all things. You will find that you connect easily when it comes to sticking up for what is right.

Although you and your counterpart have a similar way of understanding things, it would be a mistake to assume that you’ll agree on all important matters. You each tend to trust your own experience of the world and believe that what has worked in the past will lead you to a correct conclusion. If your experiences are wildly different, or you are each loyal to competing traditions, then you may find yourself having a heated debate.

If you find yourself in conflict over what you believe, most of the time, you will each retreat into a logical and objective process of decision-making. While neither of you tend to get especially hurt when one of your beliefs is challenged, you do tend to have a blind spot in considering your personal values and emotional needs. A relationship between two people such as yourselves tends to be very level-headed because neither of you is likely to call attention to feelings. But it sacrifices subtlety and emotional tact. At your worst together, you're all head, and no heart.

That said, you both value honesty and straightforwardness. You’re likely to be clear with each other about who you are and what your ideals are from the start, and to stick to these value systems over the long term. Building trust in this pairing is often very easy, as you appreciate loyalty and will stick with what is ‘right.’ There may not always be fireworks, but you are likely to feel an easy rapport and have plenty of things in common.

As time passes, it can be challenging for two people of this type to move their relationships to a deeper level. To create a deep bond, you also need to achieve compassion, empathy, intimacy and cooperation. Although these may not be goals you'd naturally prioritize, recognizing their importance will be key to making your relationship a success. 

ISTP and ISTP in Daily Life

Lifestyle is an under-appreciated—but extremely important—element of compatibility. Your values and ideals may coincide perfectly, but if you can't agree on how to conduct day-to-day matters, your relationship will always have friction. As an ISTP in a relationship with an ISTP, you can expect certain issues to arise in your daily life. Discussing these in advance, and figuring out how to deal with them, will make things go much more smoothly as you develop your relationship.

You take a similarly unstructured approach to life and are fairly relaxed about schedules, plans and household systems. If you share space, it’s likely that neither of you will be motivated to take on household responsibilities. You both prefer to play first and work later, and there may need to be some discussion about getting the chores done.

Since neither of you want things to be fully planned and predictable, you’re rarely overwhelmed by disorganization. You both enjoy leaving room for creativity, and enjoy setting a pace together that will allow you to do things on the fly.

The two of you want to know who and where you are in the world, and you likely will share a fondness for upholding traditions you can respect and value. While you may not share specific hobbies, you both will be concerned with history and tradition and celebrating important rituals like birthdays and anniversaries.

For both of you, actions speak louder than words. You enjoy experiences and probably share a mutual interest in activities that will stimulate your senses or your body in some way, whether that’s cooking, bungee jumping or arts and crafts. In fact, you may find that doing things together is a great way to bring you closer.

You recall events as snapshots of what actually happened, and have a low tolerance for metaphorical language and esoteric thinking. You both live life in the moment, and are good at thinking on your feet. This mutual taste for ‘doing’ things in the here and now is stimulating for both of you, and helps keep things running smoothly between you. However, during periods of unplanned changes in your life, it's likely that you'll both be a bit hesitant and cranky. Bear in mind that future planning, with all its associated flexibility, is key to both of your long-term happiness.

You both get overstimulated by too much activity and both enjoy spending quiet time alone. You and your partner might often find yourself at home with takeout and Netflix, or even in the same room without actually talking to each other, and you’re both okay with that. You likely both have small but intimate circles of friends and there may be no great urgency to work your way into each other’s friendship circles as a way of deepening your own bond. Personal boundaries are important to you, and you respect each other’s personal space by default.

You likely share a slower pace of life and appreciate the need for down time to balance out the busyness. Neither of you feels a burning desire to attend party after relentless party, and it’s likely that you’re on the same page regarding the booking of your social calendar. The problem is that when you do make plans, it can be dangerously easy for you to talk each other out of them. Hiding away is not healthy or practical. If your relationship is a priority, one of you must bite the bullet and motivate the other to follow through.

Despite both being introverts, one partner may need more down time than the other, or you may have different social needs. It’s a balancing act to sync your calendars and maintain a balance between your respective needs. Communication is key, although that too can be challenging as you both tend to shy away from confrontation because it’s overstimulating. Acknowledge when you’re bottling up feelings. Making a conscious effort to focus on conversations that take your both out of your comfort zones is the key to discovering new aspects of your relationship.