INFP
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INFP Strengths

Idealism. INFPs care deeply for others and believe it is their duty to make a positive impact on the lives of other people in any way they can. Because of this unbreakable commitment, INFPs are capable of great self-sacrifice, and they won’t compromise their ethical standards for personal benefit. INFPs are firm believers in the unlimited potential of human beings to achieve remarkable things, and they can always be counted on to provide encouragement or material support to those who are attempting to expand their horizons.

Integrity. Integrity means everything to INFPs, and that includes intellectual as well as moral integrity. Some people might accuse INFPs of being overly imaginative or of being willing to stretch logic to the breaking point in order to find the deeper meaning they insist must exist, but there is no denying that the deeply reflective nature of INFPs allows them to transcend the boundaries of imagination that so often prevent us from discovering new solutions to old problems.

Compromise. As empathic idealists, harmonious relations are like a balm to the soul for INFPs. In family settings or when working in groups, INFPs are highly effective as mediators because they are legitimately interested in the viewpoints of all and will go out of their way to make sure that everyone is given a fair hearing. They are enthusiastic advocates of cooperation and believe that no difficulty is insurmountable when people work together for a common cause. 

Dedication. It is easy to pay lip service to virtues like compassion, creativity, originality and open- mindedness, but these ideas don’t mean much unless they can be translated into real-world applications. Fortunately, INFPs are masters at doing just that. Passionate and committed to the cause, these personalities have a unique ability to mold and shape their surrounding environment in ways that promote self- improvement and transcendent achievement for all. 

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INFP Weaknesses

Sensitivity. Their deep compassion, sensitivity and commitment to originality allows INFPs to interface with their interpersonal landscapes in a constructive manner, but these feelings also leave them vulnerable to disillusionment and powerful existential angst. INFPs who venture enthusiastically out into the world can end up retreating into lethargy and depression when they discover their idealism isn’t always shared or respected by others, and their incredible talents can go completely to waste when they become too discouraged to continue.

Impracticality. While their insistence on standing up for justice and decency is admirable, the intensity of their feelings can occasionally leave INFPs unwilling to make compromises even when doing so might be necessary to get something accomplished. Sticking to your morals is admirable, but in the real world it may be impossible to accomplish anything unless the INFP can find a way to give and take a little and find practical, if imperfect, solutions to problems. 

Selflessness. INFPs have a tendency to neglect or suppress their own needs if they believe it is necessary to keep the peace or make others happy. When a person holds his or her insecurities inside for too long, it can eventually cause a blow-up or an emotional breakdown. Sensitive INFPs often suffer in silence, and this is a pity because INFPs and their fellow travelers usually have people in their lives who care about them a lot and would be more than happy to help them deal with their heartaches and disappointments. 

Vulnerability. Compassionate to the core, INFPs lead with their hearts rather than their heads and this can sometimes set them up for trouble. Unfortunately there are users and manipulators out there who are always on the lookout for easy targets, and from the standpoint of these individuals INFPS might as well have flashing neon signs attached to their foreheads that say “exploit me, exploit me!” Trust is a wonderful thing, but not when it makes you gullible. 

INFP Growth and Development

In order to reach their full potential, INFPs should:

Learn to recognize the difference between compromise and concession. People who disagree with INFPs are simply seeing things from a different point of view, but to an INFP, it can feel like they are being backed into a corner. Instead of digging in their heels, INFPs must find a way to detach from the situation so they can comprehend the motivations of their opposition more clearly. If it is only a difference in values and not a lack of them that is responsible for divergent opinions, then INFPs should not expect others to give in to stubbornness any more than they would if the shoe were on the other foot.

Make sure dreams and fantasies are used to enhance reality rather than replace it. INFPs who look out at the world with idealistic eyes often see grand vistas of beauty and limitless possibility that others are not capable of perceiving. But INFPs sometimes choose to retreat into these fantasies instead of using them to solve real-world problems. Imagination can open the door to better possibilities, and INFPs should never lose sight of its transformative potential. 

Learn to respect the details. No matter how wonderfully inventive a new idea might be, it won’t get anywhere if the logistical details required to put it into practice are ignored or neglected. INFPs may find this aspect of the creative processes a bit boring, but they should challenge themselves to overcome their disinterest and pay attention to all those annoying details anyway. 

Seek out leadership positions. INFPs have strong egalitarian instincts, are natural conciliators, passionately believe in the utility of cooperation, are excellent listeners, and never fail to pay attention when someone has a new idea to share. These admirable qualities double as superb leadership skills, and no one who possesses them should avoid leadership positions simply because they aren’t extraverts. Above all else, leaders must have the respect of those they presume to lead, and INFPs are just as capable of gaining that respect as any other personality type. 

Accept themselves as they are without apology. Because their standards are so high, INFPs have a hard time forgiving themselves when they fail to meet their own expectations. They may also become indecisive and fall into a perfectionism so extreme that it cuts off their flow of creativity and makes it impossible for them to excel and achieve. This dynamic is unfortunate, especially as INFPs would never think of holding others to such impossible standards. For the sake of their mental health and happiness, INFPs must learn to stop comparing themselves to others and recognize that they should prioritize their own happiness.

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Comments

Pravina (not verified) says...

Hi! Stumbled across this post as I'm an INFP-T myself. I've been scrolling through the comments and have found so many experiences and feelings that are similar to mine. Would be willing to join a Facebook group if someone was to set one up. 

c.atakan says...

I've been thinking about this for a while, and I was going to form such a group soon. I think it would be very good.

Alexxx (not verified) says...

Do you dear infps sometimes feel too much emotions in simple things too? Like when you see a simple piece of poem and then you can cry over it or think about it for hours ?or wonder that some people just listen to music and don't feel anything or pretend they do but you listen to the same music and can connect with every word of the lyrics?or you always want to help people to make them happy but no one does it for you like you don't even exist? You are mostly confused about your goals in life and often wonder why you are here and imagine a world in your head without these insecurities and fears that you have? Do you sometimes think "what if nothing gives me the same thrill?" Do you....

Kavya (not verified) says...

Yes!.. this is exactly what i feel. Wow. 

c.atakan says...

You are not alone, I always think about exactly the same things, always..

Franco (not verified) says...

Alexxx, what an accurate description.That's exactly how I feel. 

Tanu Shukla (not verified) says...

Yes I do .

Alexxx...I don't know your age so I am assuming that you ,like me are a teen . The point that you made about helping people.....it's like you are talking about me, though I connect with all that you wrote ,but that particular point hits hard. It's like even my parents see a fraction of the person I really am. And them being sensors and thinkers or unhealthy feelers  (my mother) doesn't help either. 

Sorry I just ranted about myself. Frustration does strange things to you. 

I am hell like confused regarding my future. It's like standing at a dead end. I don't know how to put it any other way. I loved science as a mid schooler and now I just can't stand it. I'm somewhere in between of infp and intp , both turbulent. Technically I should be comfortable and interested in  sciences. I am good at it. But I don't wanna continue, cause it isn't fun anymore. 

c.atakan says...

Hello, I'm a 19 year old infp.And i suffering from trying to find my purpose in my life.I can't find anything that i am good at.I mean i'm doing some stuff, like photography,painting, drawing, graphic design etc. And other people like what I do. But I feel like these things just ain't right for me,to do in my future as a career.After all, I get bored with everything so quickly. I can't do any of them for a long time.İts funny, because of  this i have no addiction to anything.no game no smoking no alcohol, nothing. All aside, I don't even have a good friend. I have no one to talk about my worries.Even if I told some of my family, they never got a solution.I have no idea what to do, whatever I do, it seems in vain.I guess the reason is because ı think i cant make money by doing these in the future.I know money is not important to my personality type, but I can't stop think about it.

I know I won't be able to see what will happen without trying them but it feels like I have one shot. Even if its true, I'm not brave enough to try. I'm afraid to open up to the world, to go to new places, to meet new people, to leave my comfort zone.I'm insecure about these. I don't know how i got here but i used to so much different,i was so much confident.

Anyway i got ridiculous, all I want is to learn how to stop thinking about these. And somebody to talk to.This is the first time I have expressed myself so clearly.I was so comfortable because I knew you were just like me and you would understand me. 

my name is cemal atakan dağ and i would love to meet someone like me and be frends.But I don't know could it be possible after all this nonsense. But still thanks for reading..

MM (not verified) says...

Go on www.JW.org   It's free in over 1,000 languages and full of amazing self help. 

Toar (not verified) says...

yahalo nice to meet you

Tanu Shukla (not verified) says...

Hey cemal you can't do this I mean you are talking about me....except for the addiction part I am addicted to novels they are my drugs...no lie.

Anyone can suggest me good books 😆😆

saumya singh (not verified) says...

hey camel, i can feel you. after reading your post it felt like someone has read my mind and out it into words. if you wan to talk you can. i too do not have much friends and have hard time telling my emotions to others. 

looking forward to talk to you.

c.atakan says...

I would like to talk too, how can i find you?

DTyre (not verified) says...

Hi Cemal,  I am 47 and your experience so far is one I have also had to try to figure out but for far longer. It is a common one for INFP's I think.  For me when I was your age I stumbled around from job to job (prep cook, line cook, working in a plant store, world's worst secretary), course to course (general studies, horticulture). Looking back I don't have any regrets as I moved around with alot of freedom, travelled, and had great experiences. I married and had three kids in my late twenties and didn't worry about careers as I stayed home with my kids.  40 hit as did marriage crises and time to revisit the idea of finding my own way.  I went to art school and played with that for a bit, selling some work but have no interest or motivation in monetizing my art.  It became meaningless to make more and I felt very isolated and like I wasn't contributing to my community in a meaningful way. I took a couple of courses about greif and to be a death doula and a short course to become a health care assistant and work in home care.  This was fulfilling but not creative in any way and draining emotionally. It did build my self-confidence and I became aware that I was a good listener. People liked talking to me and I was able to give them space and understanding without judgement for who they were and what they were experiencing.  From that experience I was finally able to decide on my next direction which is to pursue a psychology degree and a masters program in art therapy.  I guss what I'm trying to say, with this long self history, is that it really is a journey.  You don't have to know for sure yet where you're going but starting in a direction that interests you will open new doors of possibility and all the experience you gain along the way will contribute to making you even better at what you do eventually become. Best of luck to you.

Noor Al Ibrahim DHA 398136 (not verified) says...

Thank you for sharing your journey DTyre. I needed to read such thing after stumbling about this site then reading the comments section. It warmed my heart, tears running and you know the whole infp drill. I've been having intense emotions regarding my career choices and future. I've been pursuing  writing, teaching, art and I even worked in office job (sales) for 1 year until I had breakdown, couldn't do it. I don't seem to have specific presise thing that I can thrive in, without getting emotionally exhausted or bored.i

Your comment reminded me that it is a  journey indeed and hopefully we all get the most of it. 

Thank you. 

 

Arvin (not verified) says...

Hello everyone, INFP-A here. 

Something in me told me to write this, so here I am...

 

Talk to yourself more often.

You are the only person who'll be with you.

Your entire life...

Be kind to yourself, and become your own best friend...

Trust yourself

Learn to help yourself

And be brave enough to save yourself.

Learn to be at peace.

And understand what gives you peace...

Your peace is growth...

Open your mind.

And think...

 

DontResistChange

/// DRC ///

CF (not verified) says...

Thank you. Strangely feels like it was meant for me from someone I hold close in memory. 1001

bethanygrace337 says...

Hi All, I have an INFP 12 years old daughter. I want to ask the adult/teens INFP what are some things I can do as her mom to help her transition into her teenage years. What should the adults around you have done or not do to better connect with you in your teenage years? What are the ways to motivate you? Love to hear your thoughts! THANK YOU!

Tanu Shukla (not verified) says...

Hey !

I am an infp teenage girl surrounded by sensors and thinkers . Sometimes even the most basic scolding puts me in a state of anxiety for more than a month . So don't demoralize her. Cause what is normal to you might be a serious issue in her eyes. Never let her feel empty . And most importantly sit with her and listen her emotional rant every day, Don't give advice unless she asked for it cause I usually like to solve my problems my way. Let her creativity flourish and if she isn't doing any creative stuff then she might be in serious trouble help her . Remind her to be health conscious if she is lazy like me . Here as well the same rule applies DON'T GIVE/ FORCE ADVICE UNLESS ASKED. 

I'm really sorry if I sounded like a jerk. Hopefully you will understand. 

Cathylv (not verified) says...

I think it's important to let her have alone time, which is kind of a teenager-y thing as it is. My parents didn't force me to do things and allowed me to explore different things which I appreciated. Maybe suggest but don't force, like what classes to take or extra activities. Those are mostly over arching things I suppose, and I did need help with more practical things like organization and financial advice. Those are super important things to learn for an infp, anything that is "real world practical" based. Without that it's harder becoming a responsible adult and you end up relying on others to do it for you. Also let her do what she wants when it comes to personal style. Let her make her own mistakes. If she has suggestions on what she wants to do , with feelings and comes to you just listen, being shot down too many times might result in her coming to you less for things.  Make sure to know who she talks to and who her friends are because I found it was easy to get manipulated by people. Anyways that's all I can think of for now.

PDani13 (not verified) says...

Hi, I am a 17 yo. female, INFP teen and some pieces of advice I would give with the knowledge I have would be to never crush her dreams. Be a dreamer with her. My parents would always criticise my dreams and claim them to be 'illogical'. As your daughter gets into the earlier teen years I think emotional support is very important and communication about where she wishes to go inside and outside of school. I went through a lot of phases and wanted support throughout each phase that I never got. Always believe in her and never give up! Good luck I hope this helps :)

Shira (not verified) says...

You remind me of myself when I was a teenager. These days I find myself wishing I didn't listen to my parents because they crushed my dreams too many times, I don't even know who or what I am for the longest time. It took many years to discover that, and I could only do it when I stopped seeking for approval from others. I ended up quitting my job which took me 7-8 years of university and training to get to. Now at 28 I'm starting all over again!

You can make your dreams come true, and yes maybe it seems illogical but that's only because you're a teenager. As you become more experienced, you navigate life a lot better and plan things out. Your parents may never understand, so you just have to accept that they always mean well and want the best for you even if it looks like they don't support you. Find like-minded people, find friends you can trust, and be the friend you always needed especially to youself. Be kind to yourself, always. Always. And you'll be just fine.

Cathylv (not verified) says...

This is totally correct 😀

NicoletheINFP (not verified) says...

As an INFP, I was never the one to initiate conversations about how I was feeling or what my perceptions of things were. When I did express my feelings, I felt hurt when my parents didn't truly listen to what I had to say. INFP's need positive recognition and reassurance, even though we constantly push it away and tend blame ourselves for the things happening around us. INFP's need their space, but they also need to see that you understand, or are at least doing your best to understand them.

Jesselton (not verified) says...

Hii, I'm a teenage boy age of 17 and my type is INFP too. Honestly I dont really know but having more freedom to explore on my own will be a good thing. Maybe try exposing her more to music scene or acting scene, it really helps me to cope with stuff like stress or even a happy mood, it boosts me. I'm really sorry if it's not clear enough but I'm not really good with words haha! Hope this helps a lil. Just go with the floor and you'll be finee. I wish you wisdom for your journey with her.

MrINFP34yrs (not verified) says...

Take the time to actually listen to your INFP.. do not constantly berate, insult and imply that they are worthless.They are highly intelligent, independent and unconventional people. Affirm and nourish these attributes. Compliment them on their out the box viewpoints and solutions to problems. Be sincere. If an INFP can see the value in something they will self motivate, do not nag them, they will resist. 

John Parker (not verified) says...

INFPs love alone time, but also get lonely. Respect whatever mood she is in and give her your full attention when she needs it. You don't know when it will come around again. Also, don't try to make suggestions to help her fit in with the crowd. We don't want to fit in, we just want to be accepted for who we are.

Alexa Smith (not verified) says...

Hi!, as an INFP teenager myself what i would say is give her space, don't feel the need to know absolutely everything going on with her life, she will most likely let you know when she feels comfortable. Secondly, many INFP's tend to procrastinate and have a lack of motivation (it's different for everyone). Please try to keep her motivated!!

Christopher Collins (not verified) says...

Listen to her feelings without judging them.  Ask her how she feels about various things or what is bothering her at the moment. Or even what she is thinking about.

INFPs often feel they don't belong so be the person she belongs with by accepting her

Cora k (not verified) says...

Give her space but not to much we like being alone but also like reasurence. I dont know about her but I am like to think before making a descions and some thimes it is hard to come up wih a response right away dont make her feel presured or overwhelmed. 

infp teen (not verified) says...

Hi! As an INFP teen, I would really say try and listen to her, give her authority. Because she has such a strong sense of morals, she will often believe that she knows the best, and that is not always a bad thing. Trust her, really try and have discussions on morals with her. Definitely give her outlets for creativity. Genuine connection is big because it is so easy for these personalities to know what you want to hear, so if she is struggling with something she won't tell you unless she really, really trusts you as well. It is super easy to become unmotivated as well, which in turn can lead to depression or anxiety. So, before things can go badly, set up a therapist so if something goes wrong, she can tell you she would like to see the therapist (choose the therapist together.) Be open to change. And know that no matter what, you will probably fight, but you have brought her up and it seems like you are very kind, so she will love you. Show her your love too. 

Sunnya (not verified) says...

I am infp.t ..got same test results for 3 years ...I quitted MbBS because I was failing at it and 1000 other reasons ...now I have pursued clinical psychology ...I am in constant delimma because I am unsure about my decesions..I am one hell of procrastinator...I start one thing and don't complete it ...I changed many careers and 25 and still don't know what to do .....can anyone help me ...it is serious cry of help ...and does anyone know INFP.t group I want to make friends

Ritesh Solkar (not verified) says...

Hi Sunnya..

I am also from same personality group. You can connect me on riteshrs698@gmail.com.

tunah (not verified) says...

Hi Sunnya and other INFPs struggling with which career to follow,

I am also an INFP and highly recommend the books and book clubs of Barbara Sher (who recently passed away, but her work continues).
Her point is we're made to feel like we are not doing things right if we don't pick one passion and stick to it. But there are ways of arranging your life to be able to do many of the things you are interested in. She also has a chapter in one book called: "But I never finish everything!" which is great. Spoiler alert: It's really okay; you have lots of ideas and not all can happen. You got whatever you needed out of it.
Also a section on whether you're what she calls a "scanner" or if it's AD(H)D.

Also, look up "multipotentialite".

Good luck fellow INFPs! XOXO

DinaM (not verified) says...

Tuna, Sunnya and other INFP friends, 

I am glad that I have found a few people of the same personality type. All my life I have felt as if I came from a different planet as I had my own sense of time and space. I stick to my own principles and it proves hard especially when so many others don't understand you, look at you as if you were a stranger or an alien, or criticize you or mock your willingness to stick to your ideals and dreams. Let us get in touch and create a group of like-minded people who could share their experiences and inspirational stories for others like us to feel needed and not so isolated. 

naoufal (not verified) says...

i am infp too i like to discuss about this

Ash says...

Hi Sunnya,

I'm 31 and I've had the same issue. I'm also INFP-T. Right now I'm in a cinematography degree program but one of the courses I'm taking this month has caught my attention: Media Communications and Technolgy. It's basically a course on Public Relations. I came here to see if that career was compatible with INFP and I noticed your comment. 

I always come across suggestions to explore the things that we were interested in as kids. My problem with that is, as a kid I wasn't aware of all the possible paths there are out there to take. Maybe I was exposed to the things I was meant to. Idk...but as a kid, I wanted just as many things as I do today. Veterinarian, Astronaut, Fashion Designer, Model, Dancer, Singer/Musician, Artist, Comedian. 

As an adult I have been in school for various subjects, never actually getting to the point of studying these subjects (general courses broke me); Forensic Science, Psychology, Automotive Technology, Environmental Science, and now Cinematography. I often think maybe school just isn't for me but I need structure.

Oh yeah, and I quit my job to become a writer, with zero plan. I still want to write but for now, I'm just doing it as a hobby until I can figure out how to put it into practice career-wise. It would come in handy in the PR field.

My main focus right now is to get good, supportive people around me. For a long time, I rejected the fact that I like being social and I actually need it to thrive. Also, I try to engage in whatever I'm interested in, in real-time. I don't put it off until I'm done with school or worry about messing up my current path. I believe we see the things we are meant to and I'm all about going with the flow.

I know this post has been a lot of "I" and "me" but I just wanted to share my experience in hope of helping you with yours. I can't really engage in a conversation with you here like I want to because this isn't a social media platform, but hopefully, you can gain something from it. 

I wish you clarity, peace, and happiness!

Aakash Gupta (not verified) says...

Hey Sunnya,

          Pursuing one career then quitting it and pursuing another career is a NORMAL thing for INFPs because infp are perfectionist, indecisive and freedom-lover.  They will change their career courses several times because of their nature.

         You said you don' know what to do in life, this exactly happened to me. I first pursued BScIT, then Network Marketing, then Interior Designing and NOW aiming to go with my GOD-GIFTED personality strength called creativity and human connection by pursuing GRAPHIC DESIGNING career..

       Go with your strengths. Try Graphic designing, Digital marketing, photography, content writing career 

Suraj (not verified) says...

Paisa kaha se aayenge..also help me I m 21 years old infp

 

Arnell (not verified) says...

As a fellow infp, the greatest lesson I've learned about myself and life is this:

 

You don't have to commit to just one field or interest. Life is too short to funnel yourself into an area you won't always be passionate about. Follow that internal passion. It may shift from time to time and come back to a certain field later on and that's ok.

 

Don't shackle yourself to one thing just because you started it. Come back later. You'll be glad you did. It's counter to culture, but that's what we INFPs are anyway. Best of luck, dear friend! 

lizw (not verified) says...

im an infp too and very indecisive. ill be starting my masters in psychology and plan to get a phd in clinical psychology too!

bella (not verified) says...

Sunnya,
I am also an INFP-T and I resonate with your struggles. I would reccomend talking to a psychiatrist or other mental health professional. A lot of the struggles you describe sound like symptoms of ADHD in adult women. I am 20 and I was only diagnosed a few months ago but it's really opened my eyes and getting help has changed my life and put me on the right path. I struggled in school for years because I would procrastinate like crazy and end up having tons of missing assignments but would get As on tests. My interests change like crazy and I always get strong urges to start a project but 90% of them never get finished.

 

Not many people know what real ADHD is and they think it's just hyper little boys in school, but it can affect anyone and a lot of the symptoms are what I described like procrastination, not being able to finish things, interests constantly shifting, etc. I may be wrong as I am not a professional and can only speak from experience, but when I learned what it's really like and got diagnosed I felt better about a lot of mistakes I've made in my life knowing it wasnt fully in my control. But be careful because ADHD severley under-diagnosed in adults, and especially in women. Go to a mental health professional(therapist or psychiatrist) and not a regular doctor as I was taken in to get examined for ADHD at 3 years old and the doctor refused to even test me just because I was a girl. Regardless of what's causing your struggles I wish you the best in figuring things out and I hope you only see success in your future.

Emilyee (not verified) says...

Hi. I'm an INFP-t as well. I'm 20, and 100% resonate and agree with you! I was diagnosed when I was in 4th grade, and even with medication, I continue to struggle in school and basic adulting. I felt I had to respond because we all have these similarities. My major is psychology and how you wrapped up your last sentence sounds like how I talk to people, especially if I'm commenting on strangers on the internet. I'm like all sweet and then say either way or whatever, I wish you a fulfilling life something like that. Which isn't something at least for me, that I often see. Maybe that was just coincidenctle and not a INFP-t thing. Aha. Anyway, I hope you both have a better experience with figure things out than I have. Take care

Anita_Belinski says...

Sunnya you are so young! It is happiness to be young and healthy. You can try positive psychology and positive affirmations. It will help you to find your way, I am sure.

Ninja (not verified) says...

Hi Anita, I only can tell my story, but might help. Over 40, changed jobs many times, worked on totally different fields, have bunch of certificates, and now have an easy job what includes a lot of freedom, and walking. I sat down at one point of my life and started to think how I like to live, what things I enjoy do the most, what things are important to me, and what job can serve that, what would fit into my lifestyle. As an introvert I prefer not to sit in an office and being surrounded by people. I like to make my own schedule, flexible working hours, and really need to execise not only for my physical but mental health also. So now I walk around the city and take pictures of electricity meters and in electrician training. Finally I realized I prefer physical work and then use my brain in my free time.

Alexi (not verified) says...

Hey :) perhaps look up Jordan Peterson's "future authoring program". What it is, is putting into words (which is the code we operate on) what we really want to do. Not the pursuit of happiness, but rather the pursuit of MEANING. No problem is too big. For example, I would like to provide a space of infinite creation and realization of ideas FAST. Just like how we can already visualize things in this reality and manifest them with proper work, drive, direction and effort. But I want to provide it instantly. So I'm working on creating "full dive" virtual reality in combination with the brain data we are receiving from companies like Neurolink (Elon Musk). My point is, as an INFP, this vision satisfies my preferred future AND it's far fetched, so it's keeping me occupied for years, and many more years to come. It's meaningful enough to motivate me to learn code for example, which is a time consuming process not likely for my personality type by itself. I guess my point is, DREAM BIG, and then trace that dream backwards all the way back to the present moment an what you'll need to do today. And enjoy the journey :)

Lucy 172627 (not verified) says...

Idk maybe we can give each others insta. Know what ur going through. It gets better! 

Lucy 172627 (not verified) says...

Hii! We can be friends if you want would be a pleasure, on Reddit there are info groups

Lucy 172627 (not verified) says...

Hey, anyone wanting to make friends can talk to me!  

tahasif (not verified) says...

yeah sure my ig is @headpats4u

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