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ENTPs and Other Personality Types

Kindred Spirits

People of the following types are more likely than most to share the ENTP's values, interests, and general approach to life. They won't necessarily agree on everything, and there's no guarantee they'll always get along, but they're more likely to feel an easy rapport and have plenty of things in common.

Intriguing Differences

People of the following types are likely to strike the ENTP as similar in character, but with some key differences which may make them seem especially intriguing. The ENTP may find people of these types particularly interesting and attractive to get to know. Relationships between ENTPs and these types should have a good balance of commonalities and opportunities to challenge one another.

Potential Complements

ENTPs may not feel an immediate connection with people of the following types, but on getting to know each other, they'll likely find they have some important things in common, as well as some things to teach one other. Although people of these types may not attract the ENTP initially, their relationships present a lot of potential to complement and learn from one other.

Challenging Opposites

People of the following types present the most potential for personality clash and conflict with the ENTP, but also the best opportunities for growth. Because people of these types have fundamentally different values and motivations from the ENTP's, initially, it may seem impossible to relate. But because they are so different, their strengths are the ENTP's weaknesses, and if they are able to develop a relationship, they can learn a tremendous amount from each other.

ENTPs in Love

In relationships, the ENTP is inventive, enthusiastic, and spontaneous. ENTPs are often exciting partners, full of ideas for new things to explore together.

ENTPs prize their ability to understand others and communicate effectively, and have an ongoing interest in improving themselves and their relationships. They want to know how their partners' minds work, and are creative in coming up with solutions to interpersonal problems.

ENTPs like to encourage their mates to pursue their ambitions. However, they may be competitive or even argumentative; they enjoy a good debate for its own sake. They typically need a partner who is emotionally resilient and doesn't take offense at their intellectual challenges.

ENTPs can be unreliable as they follow their inspiration, wherever it may lead. They have little interest in order or routine, and may neglect mundane household chores as they pursue more stimulating activities. The ideal mate for an ENTP appreciates their ingenuity, competence, and perceptiveness, and supports them in their ever-changing interests, schemes, and social pursuits.

ENTPs as Parents

As parents, ENTPs are concerned with developing their children as independent thinkers. They are fun-loving parents who want to give their children many experiences to help their young minds expand and grow. More interested in challenging their children intellectually than caring for their physical needs, the ENTP is inclined to leave the day-to-day details of childrearing up to another parent if possible.

Although ENTP parents may be distracted from their families when other interests capture their attention, they derive great joy from offering their children many and varied opportunities to develop.

ENTP Communication Style

ENTPs are lively and agile communicators who speak in terms of the “big idea.” They like to explore possibilities and make connections with the information they receive. ENTPs love innovative solutions and are enthusiastic about change, but they are also highly analytical and will not hesitate to criticize ideas that don’t hold up to their logical analysis. ENTPs can be hard to keep up with in conversation; they like to play with lots of complex ideas and have little patience for explaining details.

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Comments

A girl (not verified) says...

I'm an ENTP too, and you aren't the both, you didn't choose who you want to be, you only ignores the thinks of your functions, use it to think in another way, understand? I thought the same, that I was the both, but I released that what was occuring, if you be the both you would get in trouble too much to see it in this way, because your decisions of each personality would fight against your moment personality. It's like a P that is dedicated in School.

Samantha (not verified) says...

SAME! I am essentially an ENTP-T, for I am driven to be great, sort of, well, a prankster, and quite objective in the workplace. Although I am essentially an ENTP, I also have the ability to switch between Thinking and Feeling. For me, it is usually hard to relate to the emotions of others (therefore I usually am uncomfortable when people depend on me to fix emotional situations), but I am still inclined to help because I know it is right. I also can tell whenever I am being insensitive, and I usually stop "spamming my thoughts" when I see someone is hurt. I think this ability to switch between Feeling and Thinking is due to an ENTP's ability to view things from multiple perspectives as well as their dominant Extroverted Intuition and Teritary Extraverted Feeling traits. With Extroverted Intuition, one sees how things COULD happen; therefore, they know when to put their objectivity to the side just in case of the reprecussions. And add that to teritary Extroverted Feeling, where one knows when emotions are essential in the outside world. I have also read another article on a different website that ENTPs can switch their personalities depending on who they are talking to; therefore, your Thinking/Feeling scenario makes sense.

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

Why would someone leave a comment on an NT page if they perceive NTs as insensitive? If someone can't handle the forest, why walk through the trees? 

Guest (not verified) says...

I, too, am an ENTP/ENFP. I think being on the border of two types is less about switching back and forth between them as it is balance in those functions. The ENTP function breakdown is Ne, Ti, Fe, Si. Being on the border of T/F for an ENTP means that the Fe (extroverted feeling) function is very well developed. A mature adult has developed all functions with a decent command of each one's use. Personality comes from the order of development and comfort with each function. ENTPs and ENFPs both have Ne (extroverted intuition) as a dominant function, meaning it is the first to develop in childhood and continues to be the most comfortable (restful) function. I work in religious and therapeutic fields (chaplain, teacher), which means I use my feelings a lot at work. I find analyzing feelings and recognizing patterns in the imagination a lot more comfortable that gushy displays of affection. That's my preference for intuition over feeling. It's not about an ability to be empathetic or not. ENTPs can be very empathetic. It's just that we tend to be less comfortable or naturally talented at recognizing and navigating relationship dynamics, as they don't follow our Ti (thinking). Some ENTPs fear these dynamics so intensely that they never pay much attention to them. Others become obsessed with psychology. When we examine feelings in the abstract, we can build a framework for understanding how they serve to communicate our values to ourselves. Then we can learn to trust them. Some people just trust their feelings. Some folks trust their own feelings more than any information they receive from the outside or logical processes. These people are not ENTPs.

Slstephan says...

Food for thought. I am 100% ENTP. I am emotional, but I don't just act on emotions, I think before I act. However, there is a constant battle between emotions and logic with me. I find that it's not that I ignore emotions, it's that I don't like them because they are illogical. Then, of course, I fight them and try to figure out a logical explanation of why I have them and what purpose they serve and end up at square one again - thinking that they're illogical nonsense. Needless to say, it causes much anxiety. 

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

What started the emotional debate? I prefer the debate over the spelling of verbiage. At least, it has educational merit. 

ErikD (not verified) says...

ENTP here.  I have discovered as I get older that I'm having more emotional moments, triggered especially by music.  Having these experience has made me much more understanding of people who are driven more by feeling than logic.  These emotional moments have a life of their own, like surfing a wave, and it's pointless to try to shut them down with logic.  Why do they occur?  In the case of music, I find the phenomenon remarkable since it happens so reliably with certain songs.  The music acts as a key to an emotional terrain I rarely experienced when I was younger.  My logical mind is content to be better aware that this emotional pathway exists, even in me, and I do marvel at its power.

Galavantagious says...

Everyone has the innate ability to be both of these simultaneously depending on the people that they're around and how they are with these people. do these people see you a certain way? do you want to keep that image? but then, where does the line start? At some point in time there has to be a marker or an impasse or some sort of obstacle to overcome. so... what makes what become what when it happens? figuring this out will help you decide whether you're more of an F cognitive function or T cognitive function user. Really they're both 2 sides of the same coin just one deals with people's opinions and the other deals with your opinion. Which to you is more important, the way other people are going to react to things, so you kind of create a do's and don'ts checklist type dealio to ravel out a fair solution that will satiate the masses to the best of your ability or the way that what you construe achieves the desired result regardless of how people react, "collateral damage,  I'll deal with the repercussions later"

h (not verified) says...

oof

Elena Schneider (not verified) says...

"It's just that we (nntp's) tend to be less comfortable or naturally talented at recognizing and navigating relationship dynamics, as they don't follow our Ti (thinking). Some ENTPs fear these dynamics so intensely that they never pay much attention to them. Others become obsessed with psychology. When we examine feelings in the abstract, we can build a framework for understanding how they serve to communicate our values to ourselves." " Some people just trust their feelings. Some folks trust their own feelings more than any information they receive from the outside or logical processes. These people are not ENTPs."
Okay but why does it have to be one or the other?

Guest (not verified) says...

I agree that it doesn't have to be one way or the other. I am ENTP/ENFP and both hit the nail right on the head. Because I have a strong balance of logic and emotions. I use both in every situation. "What is the best logical solution that doesn't hurt anyone?" Is usually my thought process daily.

guest (not verified) says...

You missed exactly what OP was talking about though? The simple fact that you say "What is the best logical solution that doesn't hurt anyone?" is you acting like an ENTP. An ENFP wouldn't ask that, they would simply feel and act upon it. Feeling does not have to do with tapping in to your emotions. It has to do with the way you think. Instead of "what is the most logical solution", an ENFP would say "I don't want to hurt their feelings so I will act as such". YOU hit the nail on the head by saying you would put LOGIC before emotion (i.e. hurting someone).

other Guest (not verified) says...

doesn't really work like that though. That's why people should check out cognitive functions. ENFPs and ENTPs have the same dominant and inferior function, but they switch on Thinking and Feeling. (ENFP= Fi-Te, ENTP= Ti-Fe)

Snolock says...

I had an interesting dilemma come up. I took a cognitive functions test after not having studied anything personality related in over a year. My results used to be ENTP, though I cant remember what my scores looked like, but now they consistently, across multiple tests, end up in this order: Ne>Ti>Te>Ni>Fe>Si>Se>Fi
Thinking back on it, when I was younger, prior to a lot of heavy abuse, I was rather pushy with my ideas and making other kids do things my way, extremely neat and tidy and was passionate about my schooling up until about 8th grade(all of this being common Te attitude) where I quit caring much at all. On the flip side of that, I was spent all of my free time reading books, playing games, watching my family play games, and watching the History Channel(which is more of an Ne attitude). This has me wondering if I used to be an ENTJ and flipped to an ENTP(they say it shouldn't happen, but if I was borderline even as a kid, it's more likely) and I'm now slowly going back, as I'm no longer in the abusive environment.

Dixie Lee (not verified) says...

We are constantly changing. Refuse to be put in a box. It'll cramp your style. HA!

Guest (not verified) says...

Yes, Thank you for mentioning that. I totally agree. We are pulled between them.

Guest (not verified) says...

Yep. That is what I was going to say ... but it seems your comment has been overlooked ... Probably by ENFPs! :) :)

Nerd (not verified) says...

You are such a nerd "probably by ENFPs" get a life.

Daniel (not verified) says...

Great profiling questions! Loved the verbiage.

Kathleen K Brophy (not verified) says...

Verbage and verbiage seem like two spellings of the same word. However, verbage is an error. ... Verbiageis the correct spelling of this word. It refers to excessive, intricate language.

Peggy (not verified) says...

Verbiage.  Definitely a conversation amongst ENTP's...gotta love it.

Justin Erickson (not verified) says...

I totally love it.  I need to find another ENTP to hang out with because this conversation would drive my ESTJ wife crazy.

Your name (not verified) says...

verbage ***

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

Verbiage. Solved by Merriam-Webster: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/verbiage

Heime (not verified) says...

verbage

Smarty Pants (not verified) says...

Both spellings are correct and acceptable.

Bill Spellright (not verified) says...

Verbage and verbiage seem like two spellings of the same word. However, verbage is an error. ... Verbiage is the correct spelling of this word. It refers to excessive, intricate language.

Lelei (not verified) says...

You are incorrect.  Verbiage is the correct spelling.

LJ Stroud (not verified) says...

This whole debate is garbiage!

Groovelady (not verified) says...

😂

Vine (not verified) says...

🤣 LMFAO 🤣

Rlk (not verified) says...

So we are verbiage debaters ... Ok get it

SamW1180 (not verified) says...

Verbiage is indeed correct

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

Wordy works.

Mb2524BB (not verified) says...

Holy crap folks...Look it up.  Verbiage absolutely correct.  Thank yoiu SamW1180!

gloria northwood (not verified) says...

I assume that the person who said, "verbiage," slipped on the keyboard.

Calaen (not verified) says...

Boy have I had a passion for linguistics for as long as I can remember

People Call Me Dragon (not verified) says...

Same! I never knew why. Hmm...

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