ENTP
Choose other type

Primary tabs

The ENTP Personality Type

ENTPs are inspired innovators, motivated to find new solutions to intellectually challenging problems. They are curious and clever, and seek to comprehend the people, systems, and principles that surround them. Open-minded and unconventional, Visionaries want to analyze, understand, and influence other people.

ENTPs enjoy playing with ideas and especially like to banter with others. They use their quick wit and command of language to keep the upper hand with other people, often cheerfully poking fun at their habits and eccentricities. While the ENTP enjoys challenging others, in the end they are usually happy to live and let live. They are rarely judgmental, but they may have little patience for people who can't keep up.

Are you an ENTP?

Take the test and know for sure
Take the test

What does ENTP stand for?

ENTP is an acronym used to describe one of the sixteen personality types created by Katharine Briggs and Isabel Myers. It stands for Extraverted, iNtuitive, Thinking, Perceiving. ENTP indicates a person who is energized by time spent with others (Extraverted), who focuses on ideas and concepts rather than facts and details (iNtuitive), who makes decisions based on logic and reason (Thinking) and who prefers to be spontaneous and flexible rather than planned and organized (Perceiving). ENTPs are sometimes referred to as Visionary personalities because of their passion for new, innovative ideas.

How common is the ENTP personality type?

ENTP is one of the rarer types in the population. ENTPs make up:

  • 3% of the general population
  • 4% of men
  • 2% of women

Famous ENTPs

Famous ENTPs include Steve Jobs, Walt Disney, Thomas Edison, Benjamin Franklin, Richard Feynman, Leonardo da Vinci, Niccolo Machiavelli, John Stuart Mill, Jon Stewart, “Weird Al” Yankovic, and Conan O’Brien

ENTP Values and Motivations

ENTPs are energized by challenge and are often inspired by a problem that others perceive as impossible to solve. They are confident in their ability to think creatively, and may assume that others are too tied to tradition to see a new way. The Visionary relies on their ingenuity to deal with the world around them, and rarely finds preparation necessary. They will often jump into a new situation and trust themselves to adapt as they go.

ENTPs are masters of re-inventing the wheel and often refuse to do a task the same way twice. They question norms and often ignore them altogether. Established procedures are uninspiring to the Visionary, who would much rather try a new method (or two) than go along with the standard.

How Others See the ENTP

ENTPs are typically friendly and often charming. They usually want to be seen as clever and may try to impress others with their quick wit and incisive humor. They are curious about the world around them, and want to know how things work. However, for the ENTP, the rules of the universe are made to be broken. They like to find the loopholes and figure out how they can work the system to their advantage. This is not to say the Visionary is malicious: they simply find rules limiting, and believe there is probably a better, faster, or more interesting way to do things that hasn’t been thought of before.

The ENTP is characteristically entrepreneurial and may be quick to share a new business idea or invention. They are confident and creative, and typically excited to discuss their many ingenious ideas. The ENTP’s enthusiasm for innovation is infectious, and they are often good at getting other people on board with their schemes. However, they are fundamentally “big-picture” people, and may be at a loss when it comes to recalling or describing details. They are typically more excited about exploring a concept than they are about making it reality, and can seem unreliable if they don’t follow through with their many ideas.

ENTP Hobbies and Interests

Popular hobbies for the ENTP include continuing education, writing, art appreciation, playing sports, computers and video games, travel, and cultural events.

Facts about ENTPs

Interesting facts about the ENTP:

  • On personality trait scales, scored as Enterprising, Friendly, Resourceful, Headstrong, Self-Centered, and Independent
  • Least likely of all types to suffer heart disease and hypertension
  • Least likely of all types to report stress associated with family and health
  • Scored among highest of all types in available resources for coping with stress
  • Overrepresented among those with Type A behavior
  • Among highest of all types on measures of creativity
  • One of two types most frequent among violators of college alcohol policy
  • Among types most dissatisfied with their work, despite being among the types with highest income
  • Commonly found in careers in science, management, technology, and the arts

Source: MBTI Manual

Quotes About ENTPs

"ENTPs tend to be independent, analytical, and impersonal in their relations with people, and they are more apt to consider how others may affect their projects than how their projects may affect others."

- Isabel Briggs Myers, Gifts Differing

"ENTPs are the most reluctant of all the types to do things in a particular manner just because that is the way things have always been done."

- David Keirsey, Please Understand Me II

"Don't tell an ENTP that we can't fly a rocket to Mars, build a 200-story skyscraper, or communicate over two-way wrist radios. That will be an invitation for the ENTP to prove you wrong."

- Otto Kroeger, Type Talk at Work

Primary tabs

Comments

Daniel (not verified) says...

Great profiling questions! Loved the verbiage.

Your name (not verified) says...

verbage ***

gloria northwood (not verified) says...

I assume that the person who said, "verbiage," slipped on the keyboard.

Calaen (not verified) says...

Boy have I had a passion for linguistics for as long as I can remember

People Call Me Dragon (not verified) says...

Same! I never knew why. Hmm...

SamW1180 (not verified) says...

Verbiage is indeed correct

Mb2524BB (not verified) says...

Holy crap folks...Look it up.  Verbiage absolutely correct.  Thank yoiu SamW1180!

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

Wordy works.

Rlk (not verified) says...

So we are verbiage debaters ... Ok get it

Lelei (not verified) says...

You are incorrect.  Verbiage is the correct spelling.

LJ Stroud (not verified) says...

This whole debate is garbiage!

Bill Spellright (not verified) says...

Verbage and verbiage seem like two spellings of the same word. However, verbage is an error. ... Verbiage is the correct spelling of this word. It refers to excessive, intricate language.

Smarty Pants (not verified) says...

Both spellings are correct and acceptable.

Heime (not verified) says...

verbage

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

Verbiage. Solved by Merriam-Webster: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/verbiage

Kathleen K Brophy (not verified) says...

Verbage and verbiage seem like two spellings of the same word. However, verbage is an error. ... Verbiageis the correct spelling of this word. It refers to excessive, intricate language.

Peggy (not verified) says...

Verbiage.  Definitely a conversation amongst ENTP's...gotta love it.

Justin Erickson (not verified) says...

I totally love it.  I need to find another ENTP to hang out with because this conversation would drive my ESTJ wife crazy.

Guest (not verified) says...

First time in my adult life that I have taken the test, the first time I had I was barely a junior I high school. The results this time were smack in the middle between an ENFP and ENTP which is very accurate, as I feel most of the time I have a very strong emotional and expressive side, however when it comes to work and problem solving behavior I readily switch over to the methods most employed by ENTP. I also feel very lucky, as I believe that my partner of 5 years is also an ENTP therefore the tremendous overlap in behavior and similar ways of processing information especially in work situations lends itself to a very successful pairing. Thank you for offering this insight free of charge!

Guest (not verified) says...

I've also found myself smack dab in the middle of ENTP and ENFP and noticed that I make that switch depending on where I am. Furthermore, your post reminded me that I can actually readily contrOl that switch between ENTP and ENFP. I CHOOSE when I am emotional and empathetic and I CHOOSE when it is best to be analytical and practical. The trick, as I grow and mature further into my adulthood, is to choose the right times to employ each of these traits and to be sure that I am giving my best self to each situation I am in. I enjoy that I am fluid in terms of my T/F switch and it's a unique ability to be able to do that.

other Guest (not verified) says...

doesn't really work like that though. That's why people should check out cognitive functions. ENFPs and ENTPs have the same dominant and inferior function, but they switch on Thinking and Feeling. (ENFP= Fi-Te, ENTP= Ti-Fe)

Guest (not verified) says...

Yep. That is what I was going to say ... but it seems your comment has been overlooked ... Probably by ENFPs! :) :)

Nerd (not verified) says...

You are such a nerd "probably by ENFPs" get a life.

Guest (not verified) says...

Yes, Thank you for mentioning that. I totally agree. We are pulled between them.

Snolock says...

I had an interesting dilemma come up. I took a cognitive functions test after not having studied anything personality related in over a year. My results used to be ENTP, though I cant remember what my scores looked like, but now they consistently, across multiple tests, end up in this order: Ne>Ti>Te>Ni>Fe>Si>Se>Fi
Thinking back on it, when I was younger, prior to a lot of heavy abuse, I was rather pushy with my ideas and making other kids do things my way, extremely neat and tidy and was passionate about my schooling up until about 8th grade(all of this being common Te attitude) where I quit caring much at all. On the flip side of that, I was spent all of my free time reading books, playing games, watching my family play games, and watching the History Channel(which is more of an Ne attitude). This has me wondering if I used to be an ENTJ and flipped to an ENTP(they say it shouldn't happen, but if I was borderline even as a kid, it's more likely) and I'm now slowly going back, as I'm no longer in the abusive environment.

Guest (not verified) says...

I, too, am an ENTP/ENFP. I think being on the border of two types is less about switching back and forth between them as it is balance in those functions. The ENTP function breakdown is Ne, Ti, Fe, Si. Being on the border of T/F for an ENTP means that the Fe (extroverted feeling) function is very well developed. A mature adult has developed all functions with a decent command of each one's use. Personality comes from the order of development and comfort with each function. ENTPs and ENFPs both have Ne (extroverted intuition) as a dominant function, meaning it is the first to develop in childhood and continues to be the most comfortable (restful) function. I work in religious and therapeutic fields (chaplain, teacher), which means I use my feelings a lot at work. I find analyzing feelings and recognizing patterns in the imagination a lot more comfortable that gushy displays of affection. That's my preference for intuition over feeling. It's not about an ability to be empathetic or not. ENTPs can be very empathetic. It's just that we tend to be less comfortable or naturally talented at recognizing and navigating relationship dynamics, as they don't follow our Ti (thinking). Some ENTPs fear these dynamics so intensely that they never pay much attention to them. Others become obsessed with psychology. When we examine feelings in the abstract, we can build a framework for understanding how they serve to communicate our values to ourselves. Then we can learn to trust them. Some people just trust their feelings. Some folks trust their own feelings more than any information they receive from the outside or logical processes. These people are not ENTPs.

Elena Schneider (not verified) says...

"It's just that we (nntp's) tend to be less comfortable or naturally talented at recognizing and navigating relationship dynamics, as they don't follow our Ti (thinking). Some ENTPs fear these dynamics so intensely that they never pay much attention to them. Others become obsessed with psychology. When we examine feelings in the abstract, we can build a framework for understanding how they serve to communicate our values to ourselves." " Some people just trust their feelings. Some folks trust their own feelings more than any information they receive from the outside or logical processes. These people are not ENTPs."
Okay but why does it have to be one or the other?

Guest (not verified) says...

I agree that it doesn't have to be one way or the other. I am ENTP/ENFP and both hit the nail right on the head. Because I have a strong balance of logic and emotions. I use both in every situation. "What is the best logical solution that doesn't hurt anyone?" Is usually my thought process daily.

guest (not verified) says...

You missed exactly what OP was talking about though? The simple fact that you say "What is the best logical solution that doesn't hurt anyone?" is you acting like an ENTP. An ENFP wouldn't ask that, they would simply feel and act upon it. Feeling does not have to do with tapping in to your emotions. It has to do with the way you think. Instead of "what is the most logical solution", an ENFP would say "I don't want to hurt their feelings so I will act as such". YOU hit the nail on the head by saying you would put LOGIC before emotion (i.e. hurting someone).

Galavantagious says...

Everyone has the innate ability to be both of these simultaneously depending on the people that they're around and how they are with these people. do these people see you a certain way? do you want to keep that image? but then, where does the line start? At some point in time there has to be a marker or an impasse or some sort of obstacle to overcome. so... what makes what become what when it happens? figuring this out will help you decide whether you're more of an F cognitive function or T cognitive function user. Really they're both 2 sides of the same coin just one deals with people's opinions and the other deals with your opinion. Which to you is more important, the way other people are going to react to things, so you kind of create a do's and don'ts checklist type dealio to ravel out a fair solution that will satiate the masses to the best of your ability or the way that what you construe achieves the desired result regardless of how people react, "collateral damage,  I'll deal with the repercussions later"

h (not verified) says...

oof

Slstephan says...

Food for thought. I am 100% ENTP. I am emotional, but I don't just act on emotions, I think before I act. However, there is a constant battle between emotions and logic with me. I find that it's not that I ignore emotions, it's that I don't like them because they are illogical. Then, of course, I fight them and try to figure out a logical explanation of why I have them and what purpose they serve and end up at square one again - thinking that they're illogical nonsense. Needless to say, it causes much anxiety. 

ErikD (not verified) says...

ENTP here.  I have discovered as I get older that I'm having more emotional moments, triggered especially by music.  Having these experience has made me much more understanding of people who are driven more by feeling than logic.  These emotional moments have a life of their own, like surfing a wave, and it's pointless to try to shut them down with logic.  Why do they occur?  In the case of music, I find the phenomenon remarkable since it happens so reliably with certain songs.  The music acts as a key to an emotional terrain I rarely experienced when I was younger.  My logical mind is content to be better aware that this emotional pathway exists, even in me, and I do marvel at its power.

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

What started the emotional debate? I prefer the debate over the spelling of verbiage. At least, it has educational merit. 

Samantha (not verified) says...

SAME! I am essentially an ENTP-T, for I am driven to be great, sort of, well, a prankster, and quite objective in the workplace. Although I am essentially an ENTP, I also have the ability to switch between Thinking and Feeling. For me, it is usually hard to relate to the emotions of others (therefore I usually am uncomfortable when people depend on me to fix emotional situations), but I am still inclined to help because I know it is right. I also can tell whenever I am being insensitive, and I usually stop "spamming my thoughts" when I see someone is hurt. I think this ability to switch between Feeling and Thinking is due to an ENTP's ability to view things from multiple perspectives as well as their dominant Extroverted Intuition and Teritary Extraverted Feeling traits. With Extroverted Intuition, one sees how things COULD happen; therefore, they know when to put their objectivity to the side just in case of the reprecussions. And add that to teritary Extroverted Feeling, where one knows when emotions are essential in the outside world. I have also read another article on a different website that ENTPs can switch their personalities depending on who they are talking to; therefore, your Thinking/Feeling scenario makes sense.

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

Why would someone leave a comment on an NT page if they perceive NTs as insensitive? If someone can't handle the forest, why walk through the trees? 

A girl (not verified) says...

I'm an ENTP too, and you aren't the both, you didn't choose who you want to be, you only ignores the thinks of your functions, use it to think in another way, understand? I thought the same, that I was the both, but I released that what was occuring, if you be the both you would get in trouble too much to see it in this way, because your decisions of each personality would fight against your moment personality. It's like a P that is dedicated in School.

Abdo Esper says...

DUDE I'm also right in the middle of these two personalities, I identify a lot with both, and I have taken tests where they say I'm both. I've also noticed that I can change between these two personalities depending on my emotional stability. Do you have any advice (since we're the same) I'm a teen and I've realized these personality traits of mine.

Kevin Urban (not verified) says...

I'm the same.

Dr Schwartz (not verified) says...

If you took the Meyers-Briggs and used how you are at work to answer the questions, you probably got an inaccurate result. ENTP/ENFP are very close anyway, but you need to use examples from your personal life. The reason for this is that we are all forced to work outside our natural preferences in the work environment.
 

Ken M (not verified) says...

This makes a lot of sense to me.  Thank you for sharing your thoughts with us.  I’ve taken the test numerous times over the past couple of years. And surprisingly (at least to me, at first) my results flip flop between ENTP/ENFP.  And the only logical answer I could deduce was the  variation in my frame of reference while taking the tests.  It seems when my frame of reference was professionally, politically and/or economically/financially centered, the result would be ENTP.  However, when I was in a more relaxed mode (such as after being away from work and the news etc. for a period of time), it seems my frame of reference defaults to much more personal ideas and situations like my relationships with family and friends (i.e. more feeling related experiences). 

Callum (not verified) says...

Hey me too! And sometimes its so hard, you know. You want to talk to people on an emotional level and learn all about them and you also wanna talk about all of this cool and interesting technology or have detailed discussions and feel connected to people through that but it's so rare and hard to find for me. At least most of the time.

Guest (not verified) says...

I understand why people tend to think themselves as F/T, but I thought I would reply as a clarification even if people disagree. MBTI is based in Jung’s cognitive functions and every personality type uses both feeling and thinking functions. Just because you use both emotion and logic to make decisions doesn’t mean you flip between two different personality types; you are simply a healthy individual who has developed both your thinking function and your feeling function. This is significant with ENFPs versus ENTPs because their fundamental difference is the T and F functions. ENFPs use Fi and Te, whereas ENTPs use Ti and Fe. Study those functions and see which you prefer. Everyone uses all eight functions, but your MBTI type is determined by your top four preferences. And a healthy person will use all four of their most used functions with ease. Research it. It’s very interesting.

~A fellow member of the universe

Dogmum (not verified) says...

I am an ENTP female married to an ENFP male, (Yes I know it's the inverse of what's expected of our core personalities). I affectionately call my husband "the walking heart" as he wears it on his sleeve for all to see. The heart combined with his expansive natural ability to gravitate to those in need, leads him in all sorts of directions and sometimes he neglects his home life because he is so busy helping others (in his independent contracting business).

I myself I guess am gravitating to other intuitive types as I find sensing types too focussed on the "here and now" and sometimes to be overly materialistic. Yes it's very true, I do have little patience for those who I don't perceive as competent or smart. I do however love to share my knowledge and help others (my husband has taught me to get in touch with my "feelings" although I think they were buried VERY deep).

Thank you for this insightful and quite interesting analysis, it's quite true I must agree. . . .

Carmenjello (not verified) says...

That's cool bro.

Guest (not verified) says...

How did your husband (ENFP) get you (ENTP) to learn how to get in touch with your feelings? I have a friend who is a ENTP and I'm a ENFP, and im trying to figure out how I can allow the space for him to open up?? It doesn't work when I ask him...

Guest ENTP (not verified) says...

ENTPs don't like to touch their feelings too much. You see, imagine you have a table with all the possible weapons. In a corner, almost falling out of the table there is this knife who looks plain, a knife indeed, but plain. Those are the feelings for an ENTP, they rather leave them there, not being touched, or used, or molested, no matter how powerful they might be. We might come off as insensible but the fact that ENTPs rarely open up and when they do it's a very antithetical talk with ourselves that you are invited to listen to, it's true. Show him you are there mentally, and he will appreciate that more than just standing there, challenge him and show him he is "wrong", you'll see how fast you get on his favorites.

Guest (not verified) says...

ENTPs are in touch with their feelings, they just don't discuss them. IF they try to explain their feelings it almost never or hardly makes sense to another person.You'll always hear that ENTPs are difficult to understand which is true but it's because of their lack of expression when it comes to discussing feelings. It doesn't mean that they can't feel or they seclude personal emotions, it's the problem of communication. ENTPs have complex trail of thoughts and to understand them, is difficult in any language. This is all "generic emotion talk" however. I'm an ENTP female and if there is something specifically bothering me, e.g.my sister is lying to me for whatever the reason, I'll be straightforward and confront her. On the other hand if I had to discuss how I cope when i'm scared for example is a different matter. I won't do it, because my sentences won't make sense and/or I won't find the right words. It's frustrating really.

-soooo is this only me or like other ENTPs because I'm sure this is quite common in ENTP personality types. //

Taryn (not verified) says...

Deifinately not just you. You are not alone. I am also ENTP, and I can't/won't talk about feelings, I have tried a few times, and it comes out all wrong, and difficult to understand. So I usually just say "It's too hard to explain", then just leave it at that. I have enjoyed reading your comments, as my most recent ex is a ENFP, and in some ways we were completely connected. When it came to empathy, patience, and feelings. We were on completely different pages. I don't know if it's just me or a general ENTP thing, but I find it really difficult to get into a realtionship. I mean I have no issues, dating, and seeing someone for say a few months, but as soon as I am faced with having to actually commit, I run a mile, because I just never feel anything is good enough, I obsess over the flaws in a prospective partner rather than the good things.

Is it just me, or is that an ENTP trait?

M (not verified) says...

I think most ENTPs feel the same way about commitments (aka they avoid them). I can only speak for myself 100%, but I believe ENTPs don't particularly like commitments generally. I think that may be because ENTPs view their feelings as something that makes them vulnerable. Also, they usually feel they are better than average so, as you said, they don't feel anything is good enough. It might be that ENTPs generally avoid commiting unless they are more than 100% sure about something or someone.

Share your thoughts

Truity up to date