8 Resolutions Every Enneagram 4 Should Make This New Year

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on December 30, 2021

Enneagram Type 4 is a creative powerhouse, so focused on art and being distinctive that distraction in other areas of their life is commonplace. As an “Individualist,” you may have tried to stick to a long list of projects but fell short, and that’s okay. As the new year approaches, you’ll have a fresh slate, and ideating a list of resolutions for 2022 can help you address those areas of your life that feel are a bit neglected, or simply give you a stronger grasp on your personal or professional goals.

Resolutions are a great starting point to create a “new year, new you” feeling but, for Enneagram Type 4s, the most important thing is you’re staying true to yourself and upholding what matters most to you. As you plan for the calendar year, think about the following list of personalized resolutions for 2022. They address areas that, for many Type 4s, may need a sprinkle of pixie dust. 

1. Learn to celebrate small victories 

As a Type 4, I tend to be perfectionistic. This means it’s hard for me to revel in successes because I’m always thinking about what could be better. I’m so focused on creating a life-changing piece of art or carving out a unique, self-defining niche for myself that it begins to take away from what I have accomplished. I find myself downplaying anything I’ve ever succeeded at when speaking to others, and it’s not a great way to build myself up!

If this sounds like you, I’m here to say it’s okay to give yourself credit (and a hefty pat on the back) when you accomplish a goal, no matter how small. 

2. Take more time to de-stress

Type 4s may find solace in their creative pursuits, but they may also find some stress in them. In truth, Type 4 is a sensitive person who needs some time to get over the pressure of everyday life—no matter how incredible their life is.

I often find life wears me out faster than others, and sometimes for no particular reason. Part of this may be due to other factors, but when I think about the amount of time I schedule out to practice relaxation, there isn’t a lot. Even if you do de-stress with your artistic outlets, you might find you feel even more refreshed if you carve out an hour here or there to do nothing. Whether that means going to a spa, watching a favorite movie, or even lying in the dark listening to calming music, you’ll know when you feel rejuvenated. 

3. Prioritize creative time 

I thrive on my artistic pursuits, and most Type 4s will agree it’s easy to feel defined by your creative outlets. Odds are, though, you aren’t undertaking these endeavors as a full-time job, and your regular schedule may get in the way of your progress. Even if your job is in a creative field, you may feel disconnected from the work you get paid for versus the work you don’t—so make sure you're prioritizing creative time for yourself.

4. Try to nourish deep connections 

It’s hard for Type 4s to feel accepted, but if you have a few deep connections with friends or family members, you may want to strengthen those relationships. Everyone needs a support system. When you’re feeling down, it may help to bring you back to reality when you feel out of sorts.

5. Practice mindfulness and positive affirmations

Although Type 4s are secure in their art and creativity, sometimes they need a little confidence boost in other areas of their life. For example, you might chalk up your success in your romantic life to a fluke or even second-guess old friendships. Type 4s are human like anyone else, and everyone needs a little reassurance now and then.

6. View yourself from an outside perspective

I’m an emotional person and, since I place so much importance on my emotions, sometimes it overshadows the logical aspects of the situation. Of course, it doesn’t mean my feelings aren’t relevant. Still, there are times when it’s best to set those aside and try to view myself and current situations from an outside perspective to get better clarity and enhance your decisions through a lens of detached honesty. 

7. Look at the smaller picture 

Type 4s always wanted to jump ahead to this massive view of their dreams—but it’s important to remember that you can start (and achieve) many things at a smaller level. For example, I spend a lot of time dreaming about goals, but I neglect to work on them once I feel overwhelmed by their size. If you’re a Type 4, you’ll benefit by setting small, actionable goals within your reach, and these will help you build confidence in your abilities to achieve even more significant milestones.

8. Start—and finish—a new project

To a Type 4, there’s nothing more soul-cleansing than spending hours on a creative project you feel passionate about. A good example? A novel draft got me through the tough times of 2020 during the peak of the coronavirus pandemic. But, like the tendency for Type 4s to view the larger picture and lose confidence, so goes the drive to finish a project through its whole conception. In other words, I put it on the backburner again. So while I might feel scared and uncertain,  if a creative project is valuable, I know it’s a cathartic experience that I should value above all outside opinions—so other Type 4s should, too.

Summing it up

The Enneagram is all about working toward self-actualization. As you’re looking ahead to next year, you may want to set some resolutions specific to Enneagram Type 4. These options are not only customized, but they’re also doable. Like any resolution you set, you may stray from it, and that’s okay. So while these ideas may help you achieve more of your goals, remember your happiness should always be at the top of your priority list. Your goal of achieving a better you is fresh every day, not restricted to the New Year.

Cianna Garrison

Cianna Garrison holds a B.A. in English from Arizona State University and works as a freelance writer. She fell in love with psychology and personality type theory back in 2011. Since then, she has enjoyed continually learning about the 16 personality types. As an INFJ, she lives for the creative arts, and even when she isn’t working, she’s probably still writing.

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About the Clinical Reviewer

Steven Melendy, PsyD., is a Clinical Psychologist who received his doctorate from The Wright Institute in Berkeley, California. He specializes in using evidence-based approaches in his work with individuals and groups. Steve has worked with diverse populations and in variety of a settings, from community clinics to SF General Hospital. He believes strongly in the importance of self-care, good friendships, and humor whenever possible.

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Sandi says...

Spot on! 

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