4 Hot Careers for INFJs

As highly creative and intuitive individuals, INFJs excel both in artistic pursuits and in various helping professions. They're gentle-spirited people who, while they might seem mysterious until you get to know them, are warm, idealistic, and have a strong sense of responsibility toward other people. They tend to enjoy working with people one-on-one instead of in groups. Hot careers for INFJs are those that give Counselors plenty of opportunities to express their creativity and compassion.

Speech Pathologist

If you're an INFJ who wants to help adults and children maximize their potential, you might want to consider a career as a speech pathologist. Speech problems may arise from physical disability, disease or cognitive impairment. Speech pathologists work in schools, clinical settings or patients' homes and design and develop plans to help each of their patients overcome various difficulties with speech and language. These range from stuttering to problems with producing and comprehending language.

If you're interested in becoming a speech pathologist, you'll need to earn a Master's degree in speech pathology, preferably from a program that's accredited by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Though 47 states in the U.S. have regulations in place for speech pathologists, specific requirements vary from state to state.

Librarian

In our modern day, librarians may be regarded as information professionals. Many people think of libraries as places filled with books and papers. Increasingly, however, libraries are becoming hubs for all kinds of information, including that which is digitally-based, and librarians are the people who are skilled in helping people locate the information they need, whether in paper or digital form or on the internet. INFJs who love books and learning and possess strong attention to detail would do well as librarians.

To become a librarian in most libraries, whether academic or public, you'll need to earn a Master's degree in library science. Many colleges in the U.S. offer library science programs, but the 49 programs accredited by the American Library Association tend to be preferred by employers.

Clinical Psychologist

Another helping profession well-suited to intuitive, caring INFJs is that of clinical psychologist. As a clinical psychologist, you would work with patients who suffer from mental illnesses. You might also work in a counselor capacity, helping people cope with divorce, the death of a loved one or other personal trauma. Psychology can be looked at as a humanitarian science; the most helpful psychologists possess a great deal of empathy, one of the INFJ's strongest assets.

If you'd like to become a clinical psychologist, you'll need to earn your doctorate, either a Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) or a Ph.D. In the U.S., all states require psychologists to be licensed or certified; however, these laws vary from state to state. In most states, psychologists must pass an examination, and in many states, continuing education is necessary in order to retain a license to practice.

Editor

INFJs are sensitive not only to details but also to nuances, characteristics which are essential for editing. If you're an INFJ who loves working with words, the career path of editor might be ideal for you. As an editor, you'll play a tremendous role in bringing book projects to fruition. You'll work with authors on their manuscripts to make them as polished as possible, both with regard to wordsmithery and expression of ideas. Editors for other kinds of publications make decisions as to what content will appear in those media.

Many editors start out as writers; in any case, if you wish to become an editor, you would be well-advised to do a lot of writing yourself and earn a Bachelor's degree in English, journalism or a related field. Whether an editor works with printed matter or online content, experience and reputation are even more important than formal education and offer the surest route to advancement.

INFJs embody integrity and devotion to principle. Hot careers for INFJs are those in which these caring visionaries can commit themselves to a path on which they can make positive differences, both in the lives of individual people and in the world at large.

Truity

Truity was founded in 2012 to bring you helpful information and assessments to help you understand yourself and use your strengths. We are based in San Francisco, CA.

Comments

Guest (not verified) says...

Any more "modern" career suggestions? :)

Guest (not verified) says...

I am an INFJ and an aspiring Pediatrician. Do you think I will be able to exert my qualities, in able to help my future patients?

Truity says...

Yes, definitely! Pediatrician is one of the careers we often recommend INFJs consider.

Katarina (not verified) says...

Hi!

I am a law student and feel exhausted by all stress and statusdriven people in My courses WHO would do anything to climb to the top. Every test I have Done screams INFJ in My face and I am so tired of feeling different all the time. Can you help me with suitable educations/careers for a Highly sensitive INFJ woman in her 20s WHO is sick and tired of working against My nature and be in forums with hostile people.. Yes.. All infj ideals right here..

Saskia (not verified) says...

Hey Katarina, I'm in the same boat (well, I'm a recent law graduate), and I have no desire to practice formal law, but I value the pursuit of justice and helping people resolve their conflicts. So I'm looking at becoming a mediator. I was speaking with a mediator yesterday, and in many ways, mediation might be a more satisfying way to achieve justice, both for the mediator and the parties, because it addresses the emotional underpinnings of the conflict head-on. Funny enough, 'mediator' is one of the typical INFJ suggested jobs. Good luck!

Katarina (not verified) says...

Hi you!

Love to hear your perspective, and really congratz to your graduation!:)

I am going to look mediator up, thank you for suggestioning that, and taking time to write it down to me.

Take care and best wishes!

Saskia (not verified) says...

My pleasure. Good luck to you too. We'll be awesome :)

Erin333 (not verified) says...

I was a practicing attorney for about 8 years. I have been a stay at home parent for 10. I have realized that practicing law is not for me--too much conflict, too much over-confidence. Loved my clients and loved helping them, but was never really satisfied in this aspect of my life (and why I kept putting off going back to work after my kids were born). I am now pursuing my Masters in Social Work and look forward to changing my life around career-wise. I do think Saskia's idea is a good one though--mediation is a good way to achieve a middle ground, although be prepared that you will still have to deal with the types of people that you are currently sick of in law school. Anyhow, I wish you luck!

Jesse Richardson (not verified) says...

Erin333, I am an INFJ and worked in social work for a few years. My first job revolved around helping people with handicaps find employment. It was an amazingly rewarding job, however, the agency decided to eliminate the position due to tension with the state agency which paid the bills. My second social work job involved helping low-income families find employment; I also helped them with housing and food needs. This one too became over-burdened by the state agency's red-tape ways and came to an end. Seems to be a pattern with the humanity jobs in my state.

Anyway, the reason I am responding to your post is to warn you about the various types of social work. As INFJs, we like to see people shine and do their best, however, we struggle when people don't heed our advice and remain in victim-based thinking patterns. I found it absolutely exhausting working with the negativity of victimization prevalent in the second job. My suggestion if you're are looking for a social work job is to find one where you are working with people who truly want change, not people who are just using systems to get by in life.

It only took four years for me to get burned out on social work and I now work as a software designer and project manager which offers an unusual ability to satisfy many of my INFJ needs--creativity, helping people, introverted work, etc. I am considering going back into the humanities some day, but it would be as some type of psychologist and not a social worker. I like career counseling, industrial psychology, and people analytics, so perhaps a blend of those three jobs.

Good luck!

FirecrackerVine says...

Katarina,

I am 60 years old and an INFJ. I have a true story about an INFJ becoming a lawyer.

During my college years at LSU (Baton Rouge) I had a close relationship with an INFJ man whose father wanted him to take accounting and become a lawyer. He did; he practiced Louisiana Law for 10 years - hating it all the time even with the good money. Hitting his limit with the ill-suited job he moved to the West Coast. My friend managed apartments while performing as a guitarist. After many years he got sick of the life-threatening management situations which included throwing-out drug dealers with criminal records. Still unsatisfied, he married and moved to New Orleans. By picking up a freelance side business as a rep to a California wine-grower, he supplies wine for some New Orleans restaurants. He still performs in bars regionally. I consider his life a success. I understand his attempt at law which reflected his deep affection for his father. His eventual, scary jumps attempted alternative careers. I know he would have been a great father.

Lincolnf (not verified) says...

Hey there. Struggling INFJ who is also dyslexic. Currently enrolled as a Non-Prime Finance Manager. I don't feel as if this is the pathway that I should be heading down but at the same time it's fulfilling because I assist people with poor credit and help them that way. But the frustrating part is the car buisness, where there is always another dealership co contactin the same client and essentually lieing about there programs and such. It's a greesy world and these people are take advantage of but I dont know how to advance in this matter.

Charity Hope (not verified) says...

What about veterinarian? I love animals and just want to help and take care of them.

FirecrackerVine says...

Designing cities is another. A 5 yr. landscape architecture professional design degree and a 2 yr. masters degree in urban design is needed before practicing in urban landscape architecture projects.

In the '80s in Boston city improvement money was plentiful. It allowed private design companies to flourish. "Sexy" big-ticket, custom design projects were not rare. My experience included 3 Boston waterfront parks, and a "urban park" in Washington DC on Pennsylvania Avenue near the US Capitol.

The country is too poor now to sustain private businesses in urban design. Many go to Dubai to keep their companies afloat. Others in the field have found places in government jobs under planning departments. That creates limits to scope and limits the type of involvement within a project.

I have started free-lancing and now focusing on licensed collegiate sports illustration. It can only be a small money maker and looks like it will require a 2-3 year investment to give it a fair chance.

Guest (not verified) says...

I've been so disheartened by the salary stats and job categories I've been exploring. My boyfriend and I are both INFJ's. As much as we've both struggled to find a company and job that feel good to us, we're both successful in San Francisco. He's walked a crooked path from beat journalist, to English teacher, to skip instructor, to working in a consulting firm here in SF. Now he's a Global Marketer at a large Advertising and Media agency doing amazingly well. He markets the agency, so he tells stories. He is in a leadership position, Executive level, and soon will be VP. Although it took him time to learn marketing and consulting on the job (no MBA, bachelors degree in Philosophy!), he managed to learn while doing. I think INFJ's are experiential .... and largely how were allowed to do our jobs are important. Finding the right company, firm or level of authority so you can operate from your true (and awesome) nature is important! He's now making over 150k and poised to only go exponentially from here. I've worked in Law an recently transitioned to working an eLearning start up here in SF. While I still feel a bit disconnected from the work and unsure if the business real is the best place, what is unfolding is that an entrepreneurial environment where an INFJ is welcome to experiment on how to get things done, and be creative in the business process is so much more fitting than any big corp job. I hope this helps. Keep searching!

Guest (not verified) says...

I really want to thank you for posting this experience. I'm only a high schooler and I'm struggling in what I want to major in!! Just seeing that your boyfriend turned out to be a successful person as an INFJ motivates me! I just want to let you know that you two are just simply amazing. I hope everything goes well~ Have a beautiful week !!!

Guest (not verified) says...

I'm an INFJ in accounting, of all things. I grew up with financial insecurity and thought I needed to go for the practical thing that I'm good at and would always provide a paycheck but, jeez, do I feel stifled. As dramatic as it sounds, I feel as though my soul is starving to death. I'd love to transition to something else but the thought of so many years of more schooling is a bit disheartening. So far, my plan is to look into non-profit area of accounting until I figure out how else to feed my INFJ soul. Here's to hoping!

And, good luck to all of you! It's nice to not feel like the odd one.

Guest (not verified) says...

I feel exactly as you do. If you replace the word "accounting" with "IT", that's me. Good luck to you.

Guest (not verified) says...

I am in the exact same situation now.  INFJ CPA working as an auditor, and I can't take one more busy season.  I am looking for NFP accounting jobs or transitioning to Corporate Social Responsibility, but am also considering leaving Corporate America altogether.  Definitely need to do some soul-searching.  Curious to know what route you ended up taking?

Guest (not verified) says...

Any INFJ - speech-pathologist?

Guest (not verified) says...

Hi people.
I was working for a government department, within social provision in the UK. I enjoyed this work because it enabled me to help some of the most disadvantaged people within society. Unfortunately due to years of micro management, mistreatment of staff and members of the public who required the service, I, along with 3000+ others decided to take a voluntary redundancy package. It's been 9 months since I left and I still don't have that much of a clue as to what to do next. Studying for a degree isn't feasible at the moment so I'm at a loss. I know that I do like work that is people focused but unfortunately the roles that are available within the UK are with organisations that I know will not allow for much autonomy. How do I overcome this when I feel so deflated? People were the reason why I loved and loathed my job, which is what made it so difficult in the end as I clashed with those in charge on many occasion. I just want a job where office politics and gossip is kept to a minimum. To work with people who want to work and make a difference and not just there to collect a pay cheque. I'd also require that I'm not treated as though I've eaten somebody's grandmother just because I choose not to engage in superficial nonsense/lame conversation as my cup gets full pretty quickly. Now don't get me wrong, I can engage with frivolity (and sometimes feel it's a necessity to silence the chattering in my mind) but when it's to the detriment of the task at hand it becomes very difficult. How does an introvert survive in an environment dominated by unfeeling, unthinking people?

Guest (not verified) says...

Yes, yes, yes to the boring meaningless conversation part. I almost always completely avoid my coworkers apart from a cordial hello or if, on rare occasion, there is actually something meaningful to add to the conversation. If you're an attractive female, the stigma attached to you being a stuck up bitch is even worse. Fortunately I don't give a tip what they think! :)

DeclaredInsane (not verified) says...

I'm an INFJ and always wanted to study psychology. Unfortunately, my teachers persuaded me to go for the sciences which I was really good at as well and enjoyed but lack the passion for it. Deflated I decided to find a job and after a year I went for a computer science degree. I went from job to job. Most jobs involved helping people and I was happy but not completely. I later settled on starting my own business because it allowed me to take my ideas and make them work. Business is good and there's always a challenge and hard to figure out issues to solve which keeps me excited and energized. However, the stresses are a real problem as I'm always working at 100% all the time and had to learn to take regular vacations just to recharge and release tension. I've started one community project that's not doing that well but it needs time to make it work. That was the main reason of starting a business, to build a financial reserve and gain experience and knowledge so I can take community projects from scratch to success. It isn't enough for me to just help people, it is more fulfilling to empower people to help themselves. Even if it's not successful, the adventure of the journey is worth it.

Though I still wonder back to the psychology decision. I always wonder how things would be if I didn't listen to others and trusted my gut and studied psychology, but no regrets.

Guest (not verified) says...

I'm also an INFJ and in my previous job I too empowered people to make constructive changes to their lives but I had to help them to do this first, which is what I meant in my original post. Starting my own business is something that I've contemplated, something community based. The idea of having autonomy and being the lead in a project is very appealing but I don't know what that could be. The need for financial security is also a driving force as I need to ensure that I'm able to live, which you also stated. What steps did you take when starting your business?

Guest (not verified) says...

Hey Everyone,
I just found out recently that I am an INFJ. Right now, I am having a conflict about whether I am picking the right occupation. At the moment I am thinking of doing paediatrics but at the same time my family thinks I should be an architect. I do love Art but I've always felt that helping people is my end goal. Sometimes I feel like maybe I should be a psychologist/therapist but I am not sure. When I do career tests, I always get the same 4 areas, education, arts, social worker or healthcare and that doesn't help. I really hate business career jobs. At the moment, I'm depressed about A-levels but I am determined to get good grades and do medicine. However, I have this lingering feeling that I might be making a bad decision so I'm confused. I was wondering if you guys have any advice?

Guest (not verified) says...

The one thing I will say is do not undertake a career purely to please your family, because you may end up regretting it. I take it that you're in your late teens, if you're studying for your A-levels? If so, you have plenty of time to figure it out. Don't end up like me, who walked out on a job at the age of forty after 20 years, due to realising that it was no longer suitable. You are in a perfect position to carve your own path. Go with what your heart and mind is telling you. Use that intuition to help guide you through this. However the path you take must be authentic to you and have meaning, as us INFJs need this in order to function effectively. Good luck with your studies and future career path.

Guest (not verified) says...

I am an INJ who studied social work for 2 years. I realized I was way too introverted and sensitive to people and environments to be successful in that career. It really hurt me because I thought I was going down the right direction to be in a field that helps people. It was hard working with disadvantaged groups of people who did not really want my help or who I could not really help because of structural barriers, wait lists and so on. I quickly decided after that to go for a degree in accounting to have a stable career because I an quite anxious and financial insecurity would really get to me. I do not know if I made a bad decision, I am starting this year, but I thought maybe doing accounting for non-profit or environmental accounting would be fulfilling and stable and I can work on a self-growth blog on the side which is something I really want to do. So that's the plan for now. I have my doubts, but I am sticking to it for now. I though of psychology but the amount of schooling is too much for me to handle and I do better with writing that social contact with people.

Guest (not verified) says...

Financial security is a very big deal so I understand the anxiety with regards to that. However, I think it's a good idea that you are also going to undertake other activities on the side, whilst you try and earn an income, in a job that might not be completely fulfilling. Keeping your interests alive will hopefully help to prevent stagnation. Besides there are no such things as mistakes, only lessons to be learned. So if accounting doesn't work out, then that's something else to cross off the list. Good luck.

Guest (not verified) says...

Financial security is a very big deal so I understand the anxiety with regards to that. However, I think it's a good idea that you are also going to undertake other activities on the side, whilst you try and earn an income, in a job that might not be completely fulfilling. Keeping your interests alive will hopefully help to prevent stagnation. Besides there are no such things as mistakes, only lessons to be learned. So if accounting doesn't work out, then that's something else to cross off the list. Good luck.

Kateria R. (not verified) says...

Hey there, a young INFJ!
I am a college sophomore in community college right now. I plan on double-majoring in History and International Relations to become a professor in these fields. I even hope to teach abroad at some point. However, I've recently began to wonder whether or not to switch to nursing to become a prenatal nurse. Ultimately, I hope to help people and teach people. I'm not quite sure what to do now.

Guest (not verified) says...

Hello young INFJ,
It sounds to me that you'd be helping people regardless of which career you choose, so I would suggest that you choose the one that will give you the most fulfilment. Perhaps you could contact the local hospital or Dr's surgery to see if you could job shadow a pre-natel nurse, in order to get some idea of what the job entails. By doing this, you don't run the risk of majoring in something that ends up being unsuitable. Good luck.

Gunner (not verified) says...

I'm retired military officer serving over 30 years, and soon to be retired instructor at a police training academy, with 20 years. I was a INTJ when I was on active duty and became an INFJ since I've been at the police training academy. I can honestly say I haven't worked a day in my life. When reviewing careers for the INFJ military officer and police officer were on the list of not rewarding. With my experience I take exception to that and with research into police behavior, I think there should be more INFJ officers on the street. I believe there would be less conflict with different cultures and less police corruption and abuse. Moroever, there is a book titles "Question of Command" written by Mark Moyer wherein he discusses counterinsurgency from the civil war to Iraq. On page 269 he recommends more NT officers other than the typical SJ officers in counterinsurgency operations. Meaning special operation, civil affairs, and ground combat arms. The SJ is the typical military officer; consequently, they are indicative of people where structure and standard procedures remain the norm instead of empathy and sociability strings traits of successful counterinsurgency operations.

Guest (not verified) says...

I agree that there should be more empathetic people serving in the police and military forces. Unfortunately, there is a much larger percentage of SJs, which is why they appear to be in abundance, within these types of careers. Unthinking, unfeeling, functionaries of the state, obsessed with rules and procedures. This is not a typical environment for an INFJ, which is probably why there aren't many recruits. Until the governments of this world try and resolve conflicts based on human connectivity, rather than hate and division, then I'm afraid INFJs will stay away from such overtly political careers.

kygunner5 says...

I agree with Guest. However, I believe change can happen but only with a voice of reason. I honestly believe if there were more INFJs in policing we wouldn't be experiencing the violence and corruption we are presently seeing. We cannot police in the 21st century as we did in the 20th century and that means change. Consequently, that can only happen with a different brand of leader who sees the current issues differently and will implement a philosophical change in the cultural. I have experienced success as an instructor focusing on human skills including, effective communication such as transactional analysis (parent, adult, child), emotional intelligence, moral leadership, and other aspects of human skills. I've seen a change in the police officer subsequent learning NF skills. It parallels Moyer's assertion concerning successful counterinsurgency leaders. Human skills develop universal character traits such as trustworthiness, respect, fairness, caring, and responsibility. These are the traits, I think, our police officers should be developing or be part of their character.

Guest (not verified) says...

Hi! What do you think about an INFJ taking up Criminology? It sounds weird, right? But ever since I was little I have loved Detective Conan so much and my sister has also influenced me with detective stuff. Right now I'm still in college but I'm thinking that instead of being just a police woman or work as a detective someday, I would like to be a Criminal Psychologist and in this way help the criminals become better people and stay away from crimes.

Misty143 (not verified) says...

I don't think that an INFJ studying/undertaking a career in criminology is weird at all. Delving into peoples' minds and trying to figure out what makes them tick, is right up an INFJs Street (as in we find this type of thing fascinating). What better personality is there to do this as we have an inate ability to read people. Go for it. Good luck.

Guest (not verified) says...

I wish schools would make their students take the personality test. It would avoid spending 3/4 years studying only to realise at the end that it wasn't the right path for you.

Misty143 (not verified) says...

Personalities change as we evolve and experience life. Children in particular are the ones' that will go through many changes as they go from child to adolescent to adult. Therefore, making it compulsory for children to have personality tests, while at school is not necessarily the answer when trying to determine career choices. I think the best course of action, is for kids to get an opportunity to try out different career paths, so that they get a flavour of what interests them.

Elien (not verified) says...

Well, I'm an INFJ and I'm totally stuck with the question what to do for job. If I had lived in the 16th centrury, I would have followed Colombus to America and put my name on the Amazon forest so everyone needs to stay away from it, except for the Native Americans..., sadly, everything is already discovered. 

I love so many things, and I have done so many different directions at secundary school. People are always telling me what I could do, but till now I haven't found anything that I would like, unless it should be working with animals ( but I don't have enough experience for that, so don't get any chances).

My hobbies are: Watching TV ( Supernatural, the Originals, Rizzoli and Isles, the Mentalist, the Walking Dead, Game of Thrones), reading books ( fantasy... and of course reading Asoiaf, where after I will just figure out all hidden clues in the text to make up great theories), writing books ( fantasy), taking care of my pets, and figuring out all the mysteries-: Loch Ness, Lost Colony, Bermuda Triangle, Princes in the Tower, Eldorado, the Last Dauphin, pyramides, Machu Picchu, Atlantis, etc. -, Discussing Religion ( complaining to God) , finding new religions to follow ( New-Age), travelling to all the countries with all those hidden mysteries :D

If I could just pick now one, I would say: I want to do something that gives me a lot of money, so I can take as much classes as I want and learn even more, build something/give money to a charity/do something that helps this world becoming a better place, buy myself five houses all over the world, have a whole zoo of pets, and just being able to travel just anywhere. :( 

Because I'm just afraid that if I pick one, I can't do anything else from what I like. So anyone having a tip? 

Dylan Sharkey (not verified) says...

Hi, I'm a student studying Mathematics

I'm vaguely aware that the most common job for maths students is an accountant which I've read is the worst job for an INFJ, so I looked to teaching which could be good for me - however, I have my doubts about it. Now I'm thinking about some sort of research, how could I use research to make a difference and appeal to all four of my letters?

 

mvn (not verified) says...

Hi Dylan. I'm an INFJ and studied actuarial mathematics undergrad, and applied statistics postgrad. I'm currently a university researcher in the field of statistical modelling of epidemiology. I think to be able to have a positive impact on other people's lives is key. I can survive in the corporate world if I really like my boss and close colleagues. It always felt like I wanted to do my best and make them happy. I also taught mathematics at a university level and enjoyed it a lot because it enabled me to see how people learn and evolve. Most universities require that you do some research while working as a lecturer, so you should be able to combine the last two options you mentioned. I hope this helped.

amvat (not verified) says...

Well, let me share you my story. I graduated with bachelor's degree in speech pathology a few years ago. It wasn't until my senior year that I started to question my choice. I had a taste of being a student clinician at my school's speech clinic and oh man was it stressful. Not just the paper work and preparing for therapy, but talking to supervisors, grad clinicians, and clients who had little ones with articulation and language problems. I also observed a speech pathologist at a hospital and she was always in a hurry. You have to work with so many people: doctors, pyschologists, teachers, parents, occupational therapists, etc. As an INFJ myself, I get drained when I interact with so many people in a day. And while the you can choose which population you want to work with--children or adults, I still felt insecure about my abilities to do well in this career. I've heard grad clinicians at my school's clinic say that one of the ways they survived grad school was to "fake it till you make it." I always loved helping people and was always fascinated with language. My plan was to go to grad school and continue speech pathology, but I wanted time off to explore different opportunities. Annnnnnnnd...... here I am 2 years later at 26 years old still struggling on what I should do with my life and depressed about my current situation. I wasn't accepted to any of the speech pathology graduate programs I applied to (SO whoever is interested in speech pathology, IT'S COMPETITIVE).  So I tried to find something similar to speech pathology to spend my time wisely. I currently work for a home-based therapy company where I do ABA therapy with kids who have autism and I'm unhappy, mainly because I work with aggressive behaviors (I get hit, kicked, sometimes bitten) on a daily basis, I do lots of traveling especially to client homes in rural areas (I hate driving so much), I pracitically live in my car in the day time, and as a petite woman I'm always on the floor kneeling and picking up crying children sometimes heavier than me, and always having to be "on" and bubbly, and low pay. Sorry for the long story, I'm just very frustrated with my career options as an INFJ. We're a rare group and it seems like the careers that have been shown to fit our persoanlities are either low paying, sometimes "starving artist" types, or high paying-prestigious-stay in school forever-extremely hard to break into" types. Ugh. As an INFJ, stability, decent pay, and comfortable work environments are very important to me. 

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