ISFP
Choose other type

Primary tabs

The ISFP at Work

ISFPs want to feel personally engaged with their work, and seek careers which allow them to express themselves or participate in a cause they believe in. ISFPs typically enjoy hands-on activities, and often gain satisfaction when they can create a tangible result from their efforts. An ideal job for an ISFP allows them to clearly observe the fruits of their labor, in a context that feels significant and consistent with their values.

ISFPs like a courteous, cooperative work environment where they can work quietly, with support when they need it. Because ISFPs are so tuned to their physical surroundings, it's often important to them that their work environment is aesthetically pleasing.

ISFPs generally prefer to keep a low profile and do not usually like to be in positions that require them to speak publicly or lead large groups. Although they often prefer to work independently, when they do work with others, ISFPs want their colleagues to be flexible, supportive, and loyal to the team.

Find the career that truly fits

Discover your ideal career with the TypeFinder Career Test.
Take the test

ISFP Careers to Avoid

It is important to note that any personality type can be successful in any occupation. However, some occupations are well suited to the natural talents and preferred work style of the ISFP, while other occupations demand modes of thinking and behavior that do not come as naturally to the ISFP. Occupations that require the ISFP to operate outside their natural preferences may prove stressful or draining, and often sound unappealing to ISFPs who are choosing a career.

The following occupations have been found to be unpopular among ISFPs, based on data gathered from surveys of the general population.

The ISFP on a Team

ISFPs are sensitive, helpful team members who look for opportunities to contribute in an immediate, practical way. They want to assist other people and provide support, and often take on the role of listener. Oriented to cooperation, the ISFP will look for ways to compromise and accommodate others. They tend to step in when others need help and are often prepared with specific, relevant data that can help the team understand the facts of the situation.

ISFPs are at their best when they can work with others in a supportive, action-oriented role. They excel at creatively solving problems to meet people’s immediate needs. ISFPs shy away from theory and future projections, and may become impatient with ideas that have no concrete benefit for people. ISFPs are characteristically unassuming, and may be reluctant to advocate strongly for their own perspective on a team. They can become frustrated with team members who are domineering or competitive, and do best on a caring, egalitarian team where everyone’s contribution is appreciated.

For more information: What's Your Type of Career?

The ISFP as a Leader

In leadership positions, ISFPs are driven by a personal mission and interested in helping their teams cooperate to accomplish realistic goals. Their strengths lie in understanding the needs and concerns of the people they work with and adapting gracefully to changing circumstances. ISFP leaders are practical and down-to-earth, good at sizing up resources and assessing the requirements of the current situation. They are good at building trust and leading by example, preferring to be quietly supportive rather than authoritarian or domineering.

ISFPs often prefer not to be in a leadership role, but are sometimes motivated to take the lead when the project is personally significant to them. When they do lead, they do best heading a small, cooperative team to achieve practical and tangible results.

Primary tabs

Comments

david rico (not verified) says...

I took this assessment, and now it's making me question my college career. I have ISPF too, and in one aspect i have chosen the right path. I am going to be a massage therapist, but as far as my college career goes, I am going to be an English teacher. However it says that I am not meant to be a school administrator.

Guest (not verified) says...

Remember this is basically and educated guess based an a select amount of people studied if you think you're going to be good as a teacher or someone else does don't let this opinion get in the way!

Guest (not verified) says...

Look into Montessori- I'm an ISFP teaching at a Montessori school. The values and activities seem to line up a lot more than the traditional US school system in its current state

Guest (not verified) says...

I was reading up on this on another site & it said we make great teachers.. We usually cannot get through the studying part though... However if we can push ourselves we make wonderful teachers

Mary Anne (not verified) says...

David

I too am an ISFP ( used the MBTI for more than 30 years in schools) I was a learning strategist, learning diversity consultant for 13 school and FINALLY for the last 5 years of my 32 year career an administrator ( Assistant Principal in a large highschool) As an ISFP in education I only met 2 other ISFP"s and I used the assessment with more than 500 educators BUT because there were very seldom any ISFP's in my profession I brought a totally different viewpoint to every meeting, school and project I worked on. I excelled at what I did but certainly had to believe in my belief in what the education system could be or what a school could be. I was excellent at what I did because no one else was doing it my way. Do what you choose and you will love it and bring another point of view very rarely heard.

Remember the majority of dropouts are SP's so for them to meet an instructor or and administrator who understands them is a gift beyond anything you can imagine.

Become an administrator!!!! They need to hear your voice in the school system.

Lots of luck

Guest (not verified) says...

A school administrator is like a secretary. Go with your passion. I'm sure you'll be an excellent English teacher.

Guest (not verified) says...

it says you will be a great teacher, admin is management.

Guest (not verified) says...

Teaching is not the same as school administration. Administrators include principals, deans, superintendents, etc.

Guest (not verified) says...

This is why I'm glad I didn't know my ISFP type until after I finished college! I chose a major based in very cerebral, esoteric theory, and although I got mostly As, as I told my prof when he tried to get me to take on harder assignments than others, "I may be one of your stronger students as you say, but this doesn't come easy for me! I work really, really hard and it takes me a long time to get this stuff." However, I do not regret finishing my ill-matched degree, for better or for worse, since we ISFPs have a hard time finishing college in general. And as the studies show, just finishing your bachelor's in anything gives you more lifetime earning power. The only problem is you may not be using that English degree to teach, for example. You might use it for some other career that pays well, but that which might not be your passion. Having said that, however, if you haven't gotten too far in your college career, I see no problem in switching degrees if you have your doubts. It's just that those college loans do start to stack up, and switching degrees can mean more debt down the road, so just keep that in mind. I am actually thinking about nursing school, myself, but then again, I think about that college loan debt I already have. Sigh. But another thing to keep in mind: ISFPs typically lack confidence and don't give themselves enough credit, yet also tend to excel at pretty much anything they set their minds to. (See my story about finishing my degree above :-)) Finding what makes you happy, however, takes a lot of time for a lot of MBTI types, not just ISFPs. We're all just figuring it out as we go along. Good luck!

Nephemia (not verified) says...

Don't let it change you if you still think you are going a good direction. If the reasons you started on the path you are on are still valid, you have no reason to change things! However, if you realize that you will not be happy and will actively be untrue to yourself then you might rethink things. Being a massage therapist is something I have considered, however my hands are not strong enough. It sounds like a great profession for us ISFPs. If you become an English teacher, that will also be amazing-- I wish I had been taught English by ISFPs or similar types who would nurture and focus on the beauty of writing rather than the deadline. My mother got me into creative writing and I "self learned" how to love literature and writing, both technical and creative. You'll just have to keep in mind that you have blind spots and check up on them every once in a while if you are in a vocation that is a challenge to you. I am headed toward law school next year and the page says that being a lawyer is one of the least popular careers for ISFPs, but I am going to try to specialize in family law minus divorce. E.g. elderly law, adoptions, and anything where I would represent a child. That is how I will make it worthwhile. My dad is a worker's compensation attorney and I know I would hate that-- endless perusal of every factoid and keeping a million factoids in line on a million cases, often interviewing people who are trying to defraud someone else... Blech! :P

Guest (not verified) says...

Yes, the writing thing! INFPs are the ones who typically get most of the credit for being gifted with the written word, but I was actually a pretty good writer in high school and college. We often believe that writing skills are a thing of divine providence, but as you say, you can learn to be a great writer. For me, I struggled with writing until the 11th grade when my AP history teacher provided a clear blue print for the parts of an essay, how to arrange it, what it must accomplish, etc. He basically spelled it all out while other teachers had a habit of speaking about writing as if it were some product of spontaneous inspiration that we should always be on the look out (for) and drop everything to grab it once it clutches us. In many ways, teachers made it seem as if great writers are only born, never made. It would be helpful in our education system to read more of the "duds" those great writers produced instead of just being slapped upside the head with all their epic sagas of brilliance. At least then we could see that even the most naturally gifted get dry spells. No wonder kids get discouraged. ... I also expanded my vocabulary by memorizing definitions, etc, to make my writing more melodic and engaging. I can analyze things pretty well, but this was also a learned skill and something that takes a great deal of energy from me. But math? Eh, not ever my strong point. Higher math just never seemed relevant to my life, which I guess taps into the ISFP need to know HOW something will be useful to us. ... I guess my conclusion is that we ISFPs can learn anything and master it, but it just takes lifelong interest and practice to maintain certain skills, like good writing. My husband, an NP, is a professional journalist and can analyze something in an instant and make his observation seem so obvious. Ha.

Guest (not verified) says...

Go with your gut. I'm reading ISPF for the first time and it is dead on. Now I realize how my life has changed when I switched from 1.5 years of Criminal Justice to Photography. I don't have the money coming in but I'm the happiest I've ever been... EVER!

Guest (not verified) says...

That's awesome! Just follow your dream and everything should work out great! ^^ Oh I am ISFP too by the way. :)

ahealey says...

I am amazed at how dead on this is...I am a ISFP and feel amazed I am in the right field and heading in the right direction in my classes and wanting to work in doctors offices instead of a hospital.

TayTayeds (not verified) says...

Is it weird that I want to make music?

deebcapozzi says...

Weird? No...but gifted! Never say no to your urges when it comes to the Arts. Music is one of the Fine Arts. Music is the universal language, crossing all borders it is free and born of the heart. Listen to your passions, they will guide you.

Guest (not verified) says...

No its not weird at all! I feel the exact same too! What type of music would you like to make?

Maryrose (not verified) says...

No; music is my passion. I am an ISFP (and it's dead-on), and music can be included in arts. So no, it's perfectly normal.

Amanda Jacobson (not verified) says...

Me too!!

Guest (not verified) says...

If you don't mind me asking, what career path did you choose? I recently learned that I am an ISFP and seeing this list helps tremendously! (I am in the medical field and have been wondering if I should continue on this path)

T (not verified) says...

ISFP here. I'm a designer. I'm happy I'm on the right path.

Teafairy (not verified) says...

What kind of designer? What was the journey like to landing where you are now?

Guest (not verified) says...

Depends I'm also a isfp I love makeup, hair, photography, landscaping and I love to paint. I get stressed out easily though especially with my kids. But I also was a cna at a care home for 7 years, I have a strong passion to help others. Even though I hated the rules I loved the residents and would go far and beyond too meet their needs. I guess I care too much for people. I also hate seeing others in pain. I see the inner beauty of those people, their passions, their hurts, and knowing their time on earth is short. I want to make sure they get treated with the love other might not be there for them in their final days. The scheduled sucked and didn't do well with new rules, I lost my cool a few times at the nurses an almost got fired. I was easily stressed out and the nurses were very demanding. I prefer to be a cosmologist or photographer but have doubted myself with the compition out there. I don't know how to say yes continue bc of your caring heart for others or no bc the rules and demands and scheduling is a pain. All I can help with is sharing my own experiences, which I hope will help!!!

deebcapozzi says...

How much do you like cosmetology? Do you have a degree? ...and photography? Can you do all the things you feel passionate about? You are compassionate and caring, please don't waste that. The world needs our humanity in these times. I really appreciate how you feel. Good luck!

Guest (not verified) says...

as am i this is entirely on point

TA1979 (not verified) says...

I absolutely think this is a guide to tendencies that one may have. Fortunately we are not robots, and adapt to the world more than this website suggests. I do feel that I have many attributes of the isfp, however, I also feel as I'm a leader and not a follower.  I do not follow many as there are bad leadership qualities and unproductive leaders even though people put the ENTJ or Narcissistic personality in these positions. I have found in my personal experience it's their gift to BS and not actually produce results. I can see through this from the beginning and when expected to follow these methods, yes of course I will not, as I know there effective methods to being a leader than just again, BSing. Right? 

As much as people want to put the ENTJ on a leadership peddle stool, we give them way more credit than usually deserved.

I worked for a Dean that said he demoted himself to Dean from a CEO, but had absolutely no idea what he was doing. Me, being put there unwillingly, knew he was a complete idiot. I was also new to this position annd tried to explain I had no access to many of the things he wanted me to do. So, why didnt he just go ahead and hire a full time admin.? I let him know from the beginning I'm going to grad school and not interested in the position and only want part time.

He thought, after 8 months of working for the college, he could accomplish things as if he did in the corporate world. Even had a two day retreat and paid a speaker 1000.00 to tell professors things that were completely irrelevant to producing any successful results.

Why would he try to tell them how to do their job when they have the most successful program, and for years!

One of the professors tried to tell him it's not the same corporate world experience that you have. He got extremely offended and almost went to battle.

So whether you're an ISFP or INTJ or the opposite, we are put in positions in life to strengthen ourselves, in being productive, successful, and competent sometimes even more than the personality type than originally thought.

We as people are like sheep. We tend to put too much stock in MBTI, or other pioneers. 

We do have our own gifts and talents to and I have put myself in positions such as serving in the military, to strengthen my character. So, although I may not be a natural born leader, I find that I have better leadership qualities than many I've seen in positions that are leaders.

Johnjohny (not verified) says...

I totally get your point. I am the same and always felt that way: although I don’t like to be in the position of leading, very often I find like I could be a way much better leader than many leaders I’ve work with.

i believe it’s because us, IFSP types, are naturally intuitive and are good at planning.

scaussie (not verified) says...

I come out as an ISFP, and although we are not traditional leaders, a Director once said to me that he could see as a manger (reluctant one at that!) that I was a great teacher and did not know how I managed out bring some of the worst thought of staff in the way of productivty into well regarded productive members of staff, but he found it very refreshing. As a manager, I find that my tecnique is always one of as a teacher or guide rather than the traditional leader is thought to be. I show compassion, commitment and understanding, never one to shy away from owning and speaking up about my mistakes. I think it makes staff members feel totally comfortable to ask questions and make mistakes themselves, if they mess up, I am there to support and pitch in and give them full credit to others. I see my team as a reflection of my own ability. This personality type is extremely likeable as well. I think over time, people want to do a good job and this is when they get noticed in other parts of the organisation. We bring the best out in people because we take the time to understand them. It does take time to build this up and I think that if we were to use tecniques like discipline and targets, we would be very unhappy and fail as a leader. We wont be leading the head of platoon anytime soon for sure but there is a place for our leadership qualities in a corporate world if given the chance!

Guardian (not verified) says...

Yes, MBTI most definitely is a guide to tendencies. It doesn't show how you are in every situation, rather it assesses your core personality. Factors such as past, trauma and experience will move you away from the core.

Judging by what you wrote you seem to be ISFP. Of course you will not follow a leader who is incompetent, you have strong values which you wont let go easily, if at all. Adding this to the fact you went to military to strenghten your character it makes sense that you  are a leader type. You hold your values high, in this case one of your values is to have a strong character, being prepared for whatever is to come.

Also ISFJ might fit you but I dont have enough information on that. You are who you are and thats great. Keep raising up new leaders :)

Guest (not verified) says...

This did not fit me at all

Issaccccccccc (not verified) says...

lol F

Guest (not verified) says...

The tests sometimes are skewed by many factors - I find this dead on for me! However tests gave me other types. I found this to be my type by looking at the cognitive functions and recommend that method ;P

Share your thoughts

Truity up to date