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INTPs and Other Personality Types

Kindred Spirits

People of the following types are more likely than most to share the INTP's values, interests, and general approach to life. They won't necessarily agree on everything, and there's no guarantee they'll always get along, but they're more likely to feel an easy rapport and have plenty of things in common.

Intriguing Differences

People of the following types are likely to strike the INTP as similar in character, but with some key differences which may make them seem especially intriguing. The INTP may find people of these types particularly interesting and attractive to get to know. Relationships between INTPs and these types should have a good balance of commonalities and opportunities to challenge one another.

Potential Complements

INTPs may not feel an immediate connection with people of the following types, but on getting to know each other, they'll likely find they have some important things in common, as well as some things to teach one other. Although people of these types may not attract the INTP initially, their relationships present a lot of potential to complement and learn from one other.

Challenging Opposites

People of the following types present the most potential for personality clash and conflict with the INTP, but also the best opportunities for growth. Because people of these types have fundamentally different values and motivations from the INTP's, initially, it may seem impossible to relate. But because they are so different, their strengths are the INTP's weaknesses, and if they are able to develop a relationship, they can learn a tremendous amount from each other.

INTPs in Love

INTPs are independent and clever partners. They enjoy engaging intellectually and want an intelligent partner who can match their ability to think critically.

INTPs have little appetite for the mundane aspects of life, and may disregard the usual rituals of a relationship. They are rarely interested in tradition, preferring instead to design a lifestyle that makes sense for the parties involved—even if it looks highly unconventional to other people. They are tolerant of individual preferences but will rarely do something because they are told they "should."

INTPs tend to analyze the theory behind everything, and may interpret human interactions with the detached logic of a psychological researcher. They may find others difficult to deal with when they cannot understand the logic behind their behavior. When things get too emotional, they may retreat to their own world of thoughts and ideas.

INTPs want plenty of space in a relationship to explore their own thoughts, ideas, and interests. They value a partner that appreciates their ingenuity and problem-solving ability, and one that understands their need for autonomy.

INTPs as Parents

As parents, INTPs encourage competence and independent problem solving. They often do not tune in easily to their children's feelings, but will enthusiastically help them to reason out a complex dilemma.

INTPs are usually involved in their own projects or ideas and typically do not take much pleasure in the mundane, day-to-day tasks of caring for children. As a result, the Architect parent may sometimes seem distant to their children, but their true delight in parenting is in sharing exciting ideas and concepts with young minds.

For more information: Please Understand Me II

INTP Communication Style

INTPs can be insightful communicators, when the subject inspires them. Thoughtful and independent, they may not have a great need for conversation, but when discussing complex concepts or innovative ideas they can become quite intense and display a wealth of information and insight. Logical and analytical, they can weigh possibilities endlessly and are great at playing devil’s advocate. They love to pick apart ideas but are not convinced by anything but the most rational of analyses; they can spot a flaw in logic a mile away, and rarely hesitate to point it out.

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Comments

Scott Stratton (not verified) says...

I see nothing in the world but greater and lesser shades of grey ... in greater or lesser patterns of complexity ... in more loosely or more intricately linked connections; and with all of it in motion; changing. Those who see only black and white are necessarily seeing selectively and often transforming what they see, sometimes extraoridinarily so. However, there are times when clarity of purpose and action is the greatest need, and the INTPs endlessly swirling greys are crippling, then And then there are those that see light (or dark) so strongly, and their own personality is so powerful that they can impose their view of the world onto it, and change it ... and sometimes that is what is needed.

INTPs, perhaps better than anyone else, can see all of these things for what they are: see when analysis must give way to action and how harnessing emotions as a tool and "seeing" (or tactically choosing to see) only one truth for a while is the optimal strategy ... but the INTP cannot do it themselves. They can see that the White Knight whose strength of conviction ignores 90% of the actual reality, and they see how the White Knight will change the world anyway, maybe for the good but never in the simple way they think ... the most penetrating INTPs see exactly how that black & white view + choices and actions + reactions + time + luck will inevitablye fracture into shades of gray ... they see, but with seeing can they use that knowledge to do it themselves (if it is necessary)? Or it would result in a worse world - can they use that knowledge to interevene? Rarely, I think. That is one of our great weaknesses.

INTPs, I believe, are deep and profound thinkers and often have a clearer view of the world - and what forces and systems move it - than any other type; but like all types,it is what we do with that ability, and whether we can overcome our particular weaknesses that determines if the particular person is extraordinary or not; is "smart" and not just "intelligent". I think that equation exists for all and is not dependent on type; only the specifics of their strengths and weaknesses and the actual life they live.

Unnerved by INTP (not verified) says...

agree. we dance in the gray areas. 

mdoheny says...

thanks .. i was on the fence between being an INTP or an ISTP when i read this :
"not smart, because intp's don't use people, intp's dont really gossip, intp's beleive in good over evil"

now, how to get smart and stop letting less intelligent people use me? (i mean ... us lol)

SaraSerenity93 (not verified) says...

That's anecdotal evidence.

Logician (not verified) says...

That's not a very INTP thing to say - claiming it's "almost 100% accurate" when confronted with evidence of inaccuracy? Disagreeing with another person's personal experience, which is entirely subjective and therefore should not be called into question? If this site typed you as INTP, I'd say we have even more evidence of its inaccuracy.

Ignacio Beltrán (not verified) says...

My best friend is a Psychologist which I tell uses ONE channel to arrive at a conclusion: that of realism, the kind that you can see and count. INTPs have many more channels: the creative, intuitive, deep perception and thought that would just be similar to a VW Bug trying to race a Ferrari.

At the end, he hates to say: It seems you are right on your asertions, after a year of saying how wrong and out of reality an idea he dislikes, is. LOL.

INTP 2-Percenter (not verified) says...

Maybe it's a Feeler who has just traipsed through the INTP comments.

Jennifer Miller (not verified) says...

Not likely. LOL. 

Another Logician (not verified) says...

LOL! Took the words right out of my mouth.

Guest (not verified) says...

That's not a great example, you only have a sample size of one (yourself). One person may have incorrect or poor results while another person's may be spot on.

jpnuggles says...

I agree,I found it to be incredibly accurate.

Guest (not verified) says...

True, the results are very accurate.

Alien (not verified) says...

I know, right? When I took the main test it told me that I was a theorist. It then guided me to all different types of theorists and I thought I was an ISTP. Then whatever the commander is. I found INTP, and thought, whoa... this is really me! I like quiet environments where I can analyze everything and have a huge passion for mathematics and writing. This Truity website is amazing and so true!

Carrie Collyer (not verified) says...

That is because these two types are related. If you break down the MBTI into the four main Types that have been recognized for thousands of years, ( as Keirsey has done), your results will make more sense. To simplify, correlate each with a color. SJ-Gold,  SP-Red, NF-Green, NT-Blue.   The ISTP Type is an iREDblue.  The INTP Type is an iBLUEred.  It sounds like as you answered test questions, you related to both of these colors. You were then able to dig further to determine your main color and your secondary color.  Which means that you were an NT(blue) with a P(red)  leaning.

Jablean (not verified) says...

I think you've got your colors slightly mixed up. ie NF is Blue and NT is Green. TrueColors which makes these matches also make SP as Orange but I agree that Red is an easier color to see.  I just took the TrueColors test last year and I was going Blue is all about feelings and sensitivity, not a real close cousin to NTs. This page has some comparisons http://users.trytel.com/jfalt/Ene-med/true-col.html

The INTP/J (not verified) says...

Hello fellow INTP's! As I'm sure many of you know, "personality typing" isn't something developed by Truity. MBTI was originally developed by Carl Jung (under a different name) and later refined by Isabel Briggs Myers, and her mother, Katharine Briggs in 1942. I find that this website explains the types reasonably well, but it does not explain the theory itself, which is critical for understanding your results! For that purpose I would recommend that you visit the "Myers and Briggs Foundation" website and the "humanmetrics" website.

One of the key points that you should know is that your type isn't set in stone - its a preference! Types are usually described as being on a sliding scale. For example, I have a preference of Perceiving over Judging, but if I were to put it on this scale...

Judging [100% - - - 0% - - - 100%] Perceiving

...I would only be at 10% on the Perceiving side. Therefore I easily switch between being an INTP and an INTJ depending on the situation. I hope this helped :)

R. Stephen Gracey (not verified) says...

Well...that's somewhat right--the parts about Jung and the Briggs-Myers women. Type preference--your "true type"--does not change, however. Type is an integral, dynamic pattern that is set in motion the day you're born and grows throughout your life. How you express your type may change as you grow, but it's still your type until the day your die.

The MBTI (the inventory) is designed to help "sort" your preferences for either one OR the other. If the indicator works perfectly, you will report yourself all one way or the other. Not everyone answers the questions consistently, and so for some people, the preferrences can be "muddled," and they'll see some items they answered as a "T," for example, and others as an "F." That scale is not a spectrum, but an indication of "clarity." If you answer as many items for "T" as for "F," then it only means that the indicator was not successful in sorting your preference, and you must rely on the type descriptions, further exploration, and feedback from those who know and love you best.

Because these "types" are complete, integral patterns, you cannot shift from one type to another--especially not, for example, from INTP to INTJ. Those two types are fundamentally different--one being a dominant Juding type (INTP) and the other a dominant Perceiving type (INTJ). The functions are very different--INTPs have Extraverted iNtuition and Introverted Thinking, whereas INTJs have Introverted iNtuition and Extraverted Thinking, and that's a huge difference. INTPs and INTJs have a lot of trouble understanding one another because their dominant functions are not only Judging versus Perceiving, but their preferred Perceiving and Judging functions (although both iNtuition and Thinking) go in opposite directions, making them fundamentally different functions.

Jeff (aka I have a name, not just a personality type) (not verified) says...

P.S.  

Truity

Word not found in the Dictionary and Encyclopedia.

Jeff (aka I have a name, not just a personality type) (not verified) says...

How did you come to the conclusion that this is a preference?  If I find myself energized by solitude rather than company, did I choose to be an I?   If you're correct there's no point in identifying your personality ... simply change your "preference" to best suit the situation.  When you would benefit by having a strong emotional IQ then just do it!  I have struggled with some of the negatives of being an INTP, particularly the ability to focus on the present reality.  I do not choose to have no regard for deadlines, ignore bills, or be irritated and unmoved by my wife's emotions when there is a simple solution to her problem.  Perhaps you think that coming home to a house with no electricity when there was more than enough money in the bank to pay the electic bill was my preference, but I assure you it was not.  If your "preference" is to reject the test's conclusion, simply move on to anoter site that types you more to your liking.

 

Zee (not verified) says...

That was nicely put. Though the thing which I liked the most in your description was your name 'INTP/J'. I took the official Myers-Briggs Test and they scored me 50-50 on the perception and judging part. I dont know why i was classfied as INTP, but seeing the range and reading about both types, I do know that the combination of both these describe me more adequately.

linda an INTP (not verified) says...

In response to the message right before me: I am a certified Meyers-Briggs facilitator. I agree 100% with your explanation. There are lots of sites that provide free assessments of personality types, and often they may be right on, but many times they are not. If you do the Step II Myers-Briggs assessment from Meyers-Briggs, you would get your personality type plus 16 pages of explanations of what your type means. They also include how your type handles conflict, and manages change and different communication styles. And as said in the message I am replying to, each of the types are broken into sub-categories they call facets -so, for example it shows on my report that I very sure that I am each of the five facets which means I am very sure I am an "I". The facets for me show that I am not as sure about the N, but sure enough to call it as my type, even though I cross over to two of the facets under S. This type of report is important, especially if it feels like you don't quite match the type you got. This is a self-reporting assessment, and it's giving back to you what you gave it. I have coached so many individuals and facilitated many teams, and if understood correctly by individuals and team members, it is just a gem for personal growth and team building. The assessment asks which of a pair of word do you PREFER. If you were asked to write your name in the air with your finger, and then asked to write it with your other hand, which was most comfortable for you? I use my right hand because I prefer to. It's my default. CAN I use my left hand? Of course I can - I broke my right upper arm and shoulder and had to use my left hand for about six months, and got a little more comfortable, but as soon as I could use my right hand I did and the world felt right again. The more you know yourself when you take the assessment, the more accurate it will be for you. And last, when I administer it, I remind people to try hard to think of what YOUR preference is, for YOU, not what you wish it would be, or how you want others to see you - it's easy to do so just try and keep a check on that. I have found Myers-Briggs and Gallup's Strengthsfinder invaluable for individual growth and team building and use them both a lot. 

ABrune892 (not verified) says...

Learn about the functions. MBTI doesn't work that way, you can't just switch types. INTP's and INTJ's have ZERO functions in common. To switch between the two would mean you'd be changing your ENTIRE set of functions, which doesn't happen.

INTP's function stack:

Ti, Ne, Si, Fe

INTJ's function stack:

Ni, Te, Fi, Se

R. Stephen Gracey (not verified) says...

No.

Jung hypothesized--and the Myers-Briggs women extended--that the dominant function is the only one operating in its perferred realm. All the other three functions operate in the opposite world to provide balance. I have never met an INTP with Introverted Sensing. We can't manage to follow a set of sequential directions to save our lives--the Extraverted iNtuition takes over and makes us leap around. We have LOTS of trouble remember precisely what people say, which requires Introverted Sensing. We also don't really give a hoot how things have always been done, which would also require Introverted Sensing. And well, we don't put much store in the authoritarian hierarchy: Whoever has the best information has the responsibility to make the decision. We don't care what your title is...

Our Extraverted Sensing, however, is what enables us to use physical tools with precision--not as precisely as ISTPs, perhaps, but still, we like using the right tool for the job, wielded in the right way. We sometimes have trouble paying close attention to what people are saying to us when there's something blinking nearby or some repeating noise keeps distracting us (because Extraverted Sensing is our Tertiary Function, and so we don't have great control over it).

I could say the same about every other type: I've never met an ENFJ who had any Extraverted Sensing at all--they have trouble clearing things off of a table because every time they look at it, they see something else that they missed the last time. They *DO* however have excellent Introverted Sensing: They can remember everything you've ever said, and if you're an ENTP who denies having said something because the past doesn't really exist, they can bring it right back out and nab you with it. (They'd have to be pretty stressed, though, because that's not in their nature. They could do it though. Just sayin'.)

This is the correct sequencing of preferences:

  1. Ti
  2. Ne
  3. Se
  4. Fe

R. Stephen Gracey (not verified) says...

...so we DO have something in common with INTJs--Extraverted Feeling. Which isn't much to build common ground, since it's our Inferior function and their Tertiary.

Stacey C (not verified) says...

It can happen if that person were considered bipolar. 

Cedric Dionne (not verified) says...

Too much detail and fact for INTP. And a INTP doesn't need explanation 😅

Scott Stratton (not verified) says...

That seems so strange to me! Granted I am not an expert on any of this. But I have often thought that one of the characteristics that makes me believe my INTP result is that I *DO* need an explanation. Unraveling the underlying systems behind something is what I live for. I find myself interested in almost everything but when something catches my interest I can't help but immediately begin trying to understand WHY. I have to be careful with other people because my drive to understand the underlying system of personality/cognition is often socially offputting; I mean, it _shouldn't_ be, if everyone would just realize that inquiry and understanding are good things and set aside their ego and emotions to do it 99% of their life ... ;-) ... somehow that sounds crazier when I write it than it is in my head :-) ...

For example, though: if someone says something like: "I would HATE to use one of those lifelogger apps that track everything I do all the time." and then later describes how much they love posting on social media and are actually sharing lots of personal details with others ... for me, that's like a blinding neon sign flashing: "ALERT! ALERT! Inconsistentency detected! Underlying system rules are either not understood or there is a mystery! ALERT!" So I'll start asking them all sorts of questions about their thought process and walking them through thought experiments. The problem is it comes off as either me being judgemental, or trying to "convince" them they are wrong, or being illogical, or whatever. When in reality, it's very unlikely I would judge them at all. Usually it makes them more interesting/intriguing/complex. I wouldn't have a negative opinion of them even if the ultimate answer was the inconsistent behaviors were caused by very strong, but unconnected emotional reactions and so to them it doesn't seem like the situations are even connected much less conflicting. The important thing is that I would finally UNDERSTAND how two external behaviors in someone can seem paradoxical but aren't. 

The best analogy I can come up with to encapsulate the INTP is that as we move through the world much like some sculptors describe: we see all these blocks of marble and can discern there is beauty and complexity inside the rough block. Our compulsion is to chip away and chip away until we can fully reveal what had been there all along, but is now there for all to see and our understanding and curiosity satisfied ... until we see the next block; or see that we'd uncovered a connection from one sculpture to others that needed unravelling. The "sculpture" is always a system of things, ideas, people, etc.

Maybe I am totally misunderstanding the INTP - definitely possible; I haven't delved very deeply into this system (yet) - but if I do understand it correctly, then explanations are incredibly important!

Stacey C (not verified) says...

I concur. I am a K-12 educator-obviously the wrong career for my personality type. I am that way "Our compulsion is to chip away and chip away until we can fully reveal what had been there all along, but is now there for all to see and our understanding and curiosity satisfied ... until we see the next block; or see that we'd uncovered a connection from one sculpture to others that needed unravelling." with my students and colleagues. It is burdesome to see the answer sitting right in front of people and then watching those same people obliviously pass the corrective measure by because it is more efficient to have something on paper, such as a new policy, program, or procedure, rather than just observe, analyze, and modify! They kill me! I have to get out of this business. It is literally killing my brain cells. I feel like an anamoly no matter where I attempt to educate young minds. 

Color (not verified) says...

Lol, how very true!!!

Dan B (not verified) says...

This did not help and is not true. You don't change types because of some percentage on an unverified free online test.  The idea of the preferences is to sort you into a type, not to assign percentages.  INTP and INTJ share zero functions, so one person not only cannot be both, they are significantly different.

bekkahz (not verified) says...

I would suggest that the 'idea of the preferences' is not to sort you into a type (i.e. put you into an imaginary box), but to provide a framework for us to understand the fantastic diversity of how a human being works. While I see the value of a function stack, I am not a big fan of combining that system with MBTI type of system specifically for the reason you just illustrated. While some people may fit neatly into the specific box of type a test tells them they are the vast majority of us exhibit traits from many different types. The human mind is analog NOT digital and most of us will never be confined to one box/type with 100% exclusivity. From personal experience I know full well that not only are INTP and INTJ NOT 'significantly different' (relative to the other 14 types) but share more in common then they lack in difference.

Thinkingaloud (not verified) says...

Well said. My default is INTP, but successfully surviving in the corporate business world requires a J approach. So I have taught myself over the years to be more J in a business context. I am also 52% T and 48% F (just like Brexit) so my "passion" for ideas may, at times, be less detached and more emotional than someone who has a 95% T profile. 

MBTI is a great tool to help us see personality blind spots and to adapt our default behaviour when working with others.

strugglingpanda says...

oh God... I thought I live alone in this vulnerable world. I guess I'm an intp, but tests say I'm an intj. I thought it's just me having such bipolar or just moody state of mind. Well, thanks for sharing. Toast.

bekkahz (not verified) says...

I struggled like you, panda. For the longest time (i.e. at least a few weeks) I thought, based on tests, that I was an INTJ (even if it never felt 100% right). There are many reasons it took so much time, and so much research, to come the realization that I was an INTP. The tests, always telling me I was an ISTJ or INTJ; personal desire, INTJ are amazing; and the fact that the two types have more in common than they do in difference. Based on the number of internet sites that try to help you determine between the two, I am pretty darn sure that we are not the only ones who have gone through this. In fact, again based on the overwhelming number of sited dedicated to differentiating these two types (versus any two other types), it would not be much of an exaggeration to say they seem to be the two of the most easily confused in the system.

 

Maybe it won't work for everyone but the one thing that hinted as to which type I was, was what I do with the knowledge I gain. An INTJ seems to gather knowledge for a specific use or purpose and seems to have the need to put it to use. They need to output what they have learned. I, and I suspect most other INTP, gather knowledge for knowledges sake. I simply want to understand and feel no obligation to put that knowledge to use. I will do if the opportunity presents, but that is never the goal, more a happy accident.

Lisa M2261 (not verified) says...

Me too, I tested INTJs architect but can relate to INTP so i totally get it!!!

gilbywan (not verified) says...

The INTP may test as an INTJ for one simple reason:  The dominant function of the INTP, Introverted Thinking (Ti,) is a Judging function.  If you are a true INTP, then this brief statement should provide sufficient catalyst to crank up your Ti.  Extraverted Intuition (Ne) will gather all other possibilities and feed your Ti, so that you may arrive at the TRUTH of the matter.

Thus, think with me for a moment.  Would not this explain why some of the traits of the INTJ resonate with you?  Do you not find it nearly impossible to suspend your research, because you know deep down that you don't understand the issue fully and completely?  A true INTP will research exhaustively until he arrives at the TRUTH.

--by an almost 55 year old INTP who began his MBTI journey on April 22, 2017, just a little over one month ago.  Please do not let the short time frame fool you; in true INTP fashion, I have researched and processed more information in that month than most non-INTP persons would in their lifetime :-)  I wish you well in your journey to that loftiest of all conquests, absolute TRUTH.

bekkahz (not verified) says...

No disrespect intended, and I commend you in your search for it (not that you can help but do anything but search for it if you are an INTP), but...imho, a true INTP knows that, even if there is an absolute truth, she will likely never know it. All we can do is understand what we can, gleaned from the cleanest data set we can gather, and use that as a framework representing TRUTH until a better truth comes our way.

 

p.s.  Incidentally, that is another big difference between us and the INTJ....we have a much more rigorous process for acquiring clean data.

Guest (not verified) says...

This made my day haha. This guy/ girl is a true INTP.

Mbti Junkie (not verified) says...

Typing is about the functions, for example INTP’s lead with introverted Thinking whereas INTJs lead with introverted iNtuition (functions would take for too long to explain for now, so I will leave the rest of the research to you). You can't be one type one day and the next decide you want to be the other. Please don't take this as if I am trying to be rude to you, I just don’t want you to believe a lie. I've done a lot of research on this stuff and it's a lot more complex than it seems. There are so many factors that go into what type you are. Also typing isn't supposed to show you all of your personality (humans are far too complex for that) it just shows which way you lean towards the most, and how that affects your day to day life. :D

Um (not verified) says...

There is more to personality type than just T&F, P&J, N&S, I&E. There are what some call cognitive functions (some find the name problematic and misleading). Here are the functions:

Ni, Ne- introverted intuition and extroverted intuition

Si, Se- introverted sensing and extroverted sensing

Ti, Te- introverted thinking and extroverted thinking 

Fi, Fe- introverted feeling and extroverted feeling

For INTPs we have Ti, Ne, Si, Fe with introverted thinking as our dominant function. Ti is what makes us philosophers and theorists and Ne, our second function in the stack, is what makes us so much like ENTPs who are known to be bags full of ideas. Si is that part of us that places emotional attachments onto things so that when we revisit things we also revisit the emotions as well. And lastly, Fe is the function that separates us from INTJs. Where an INTJ  may say that they hate emotions and see emotions as useless an INTP may hold some disdain for emotions because they don't hold much value in logic. Nevertheless we INTPs tend to be more thoughtful of what we say and are also largely unassertive by comparison to our INTJ counterparts. 

With all of that being said one can now see how we aren't exclusively intuitive or thinking. INTPs can also use sensing and feeling (albeit to a lesser degree) though it is not mentioned in the title, INTP. Furthermore, none of what I said was meant to similarly exclude any of the other introverted or extroverted functions either, namely, Te, Ni, Se, or Fi. Some refer to these as shadow functions (this is also a name of contention within Jungian typology) and they too can be utilized though, as with your main functions, it depends on how much you develop them.

To conclude I would like to mention my purpose in writing this. In response to, The INTP/J's, comments on the spectrum between (in his comment) perceiving and judging I wanted open up the scope of what Jugian typology is. Jung created a branch of typology and in his branch there are sub-branches and in some of these branches there exists a concept that may be refered to as the cognitive function model. Some memtion it and some don't. And since I've already written about it I won't talk about it anymore, but on e last thing I want to touch upon is The INTP/J's mentioning that he thinks of himself as having two types that are referenced by his name. That of INTP and INTJ. As there exist subtypes of INTP and other types as well, I would like to suggest to you as well as any other confused INTP some possible subtypes.

There are according to Sociotype-a socionics website that is less than respectable but has nevertheless some interesting ideas including those on subtypes as well as their type comparison tool-two subtypes for INTPs, one being INTP-(Te) and the other INTP-(Ni). When The INTP/J says  that he swithes from perceiving to judging I think he might be refering to his switch from Ti to Te at times. If this switch is constant, meaning it happens often, then you might be quite similar to INTJs, but this doesn't negate the fact that you might still be mostly INTP. Now on Erik Thor's website he proclaims four subtypes, the one we are concerned with, however, is called the Code Breaker. The Code Breaker represents the INTP that knows that Ti cannot be as purposeful as it should if it doesn't utilize Te (a function that seeks to get things done). So with Te you can not only create the blueprint but also become the builder. 

So I hope this has helped some of you become aware of the many underlying frameworks of Jungian typology but also showed you how there isn't any need for the "No true Scotsman" fallacy that we so often see in the comments section. Because ultimately typology can tell you only something about you not everything about you; it's a descriptor not an x-ray on your broken vertebrae. 

For further information you can look at some discussion on the youtube channel Talking with Famous People (they're not famous) as well as some of the free articles on Celebrity Types (it's not as shallow as it sounds).

gx (not verified) says...

Very useful insight indeed, thanks man !

diann200 says...

I agree to a certain extent but it really depends on who I am confronting or interacting with e.g. when it is a friend and I know their quirks I am more a P but a stranger or an a#*$hole I tend towards J xx

diann200 says...

Finally, a comment that makes sense I was also a bit confused on J or P side depending on my mood.

Nualp (not verified) says...

also this test is correct 6/10 times if you take it multiple times then you may get differant results if you go through some other sites to take it you may receive a percentage that shows how close you resemble each section of this typology.

ConnSM (not verified) says...

This is true and it's because no matter how hard we try to be objective about how we answer the questions in the tests - to some degree how we see ourselves is the eye of the beholder and may not be the real you.

I took my first Myers Briggs over 20 years ago - the complete version.  My results were INTJ then and after countless versions over the years, I have always been a 'strong' INTJ until recently.  Ive had more than a few results be INTP along with INTJ which tells me I've begun move more center of PERCEPTION and JUDGING.  Yay me!  Although I embrace my strong INTJ personality traits (we are superior) I read that as we age it's not uncommon to see different results after all, progression or growth through experience is the goal right?  Maybe I'll be an empathetic human being when it's all said and done..... nah, that would be a stretch!!

Kisha (not verified) says...

Ha ha! I am the same! Started as an INTJ....now INTP. As I get older, I am encouraged by my peers to "have a heart" I guess I'm getting there? Definitely at work,  I try to exude empathy? Although it is not my true color. I work on this daily. My mom says I have sometimes I am heartless because I go by either its black or white.  Now I try very hard to find shades of grey, but then I retreat to my cave much more quickly to recover.  🤦‍♀️

Kisha (not verified) says...

OMG I found errors in my response.  Please excuse me I am sleepy right now.

Randy Cox (not verified) says...

I respectfully disagree. I've taken the real test (not FB copycat tests or short non-MB versions) three times and gotten the same results as INTP. The first time I took the test was in the 90s as part of a company-wide initiative for understanding and working with team members. I was incredible surprised by those results bc I worked primarily in client service, sales and management roles. BTW, I suck at sales. Even my boss was skeptical of those results. But as I reflected, and continued to get the same results two more times years later, I believe this is my core/intrinsic nature. I can certainly "turn on" the other side, especially the extrovert but my core is introvert because I recover best alone, prefer the company of my dogs, am thinking all the time, and usually land on creative solutions to problems. Also work best in a flat organization that allows for creativity and little bureaucracy.  But that’s just my two cents …

Will Cahoona (not verified) says...

Your writing reeks of INTP. From the precise structure of your sentences, to your use of forward slashes and double quotes as semantical aids; I can tell you know how to get your point across. Categorical thinking is also evident in the way you use contrasting concepts and hierarchical structures to describe yourself and the world around you. You are the real deal.

-A fellow INTP

Nique (not verified) says...

You are an INTP! And I take great delight in applauding your comment because only an INTP can hear the exact description of themselves in another INTPs self analysis 🙏🏽

Best comment for sure.

 

sincerely, 

Another INTP

 

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