About the Author

Jayne is a B2B tech copywriter and the editorial director here at Truity. When she’s not writing to a deadline, she’s geeking out about personality psychology and conspiracy theories. Jayne is a true ambivert, barely an INTJ, and an Enneagram One. She lives with her husband and daughters in the UK. Find Jayne at White Rose Copywriting.

Confidence for Introverts (Not Another Patronizing and Simplistic Guide)

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on February 25, 2019

Confidence is normally described as a belief in yourself and your abilities. I don't like this definition because it feels too static. In my mind, self-confidence is not a single belief or idea but a process; it's how you function despite all the challenges you face and the critics who will make you question yourself.

6 Strategies for Dealing with Perfectionists on your Team

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on February 19, 2019

Most people consider having high standards a good thing. Constantly striving for excellence is a sign that you're committed to your job and support others by setting the bar high for their performance as well. You can easily spot a perfectionist, because he's the one who takes extreme care in finishing work, always wants to do more, and is insistent on driving up quality standards.

Things That Matter More Than Money, Based on Personality

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on January 22, 2019

Money can buy you happiness—but only to a certain amount. Experts reckon the correlation peaks at around $75,000 per year, and employees whose salaries rise above this cutoff are not reporting any major boost to their happiness levels. They're not even feeling less sad. And that might throw a major monkey wrench into how we think about motivating people at work.

How To Push Guardian Personalities Out of Their Comfort Zones

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on January 08, 2019

Everyone likes the security of being in control of their time and their environment, but some people like predictability more than others. Guardian personalities (ESFJ, ISFJ, ESTJ and ISTJ) are hard wired to seek out situations they can control, where they do not feel any risk and where "business as usual" reigns supreme. This preference sounds great on the surface, but it has a habit of binding Sensing-Judgers in imaginary shackles that prevent them from taking on any challenge that might not be successfully overcome.

Categories: ISTJ, ESTJ, ISFJ, ESFJ

4 Counterintuitive Signs That You're Actually On the Right Career Path

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on December 03, 2018

As another year rumbles to a close, you may be starting to wonder, "Hey, am I in the right career?" On the surface, it sounds like a dumb question. If you don't like what you're doing, you don't like what you're selling, or you can't get behind your company's mission, then it should be obvious that you're in the wrong job.

7 Deadly Sins That Ruin Every Meeting

Meetings bring results and solve problems – theoretically. In practice, they can lead to nothing, waste dozens of labor hours and throw up some of the most idiotic suggestions you've ever heard in your life. And in the end, no one feels responsible for implementing what has been decided. Why do we even bother if there are no motivational or productivity gains to be made? 

How to Take the Fear Out of Feedback (Because Everyone Hates It)

It seems that everyone hates feedback. Employers and managers hate giving it as much as employees hate receiving it. No matter how tactful you are, or how thick-skinned your employee is, it doesn't take much for it all to go pear shaped. We're sensitive souls when it comes to the judgment of our work effort. It doesn't take much criticism to shatter our self-esteem.

So, how do you tell an employee there's room for improvement and leave them feeling inspired? Here are some tips.

THE FINE PRINT:

Myers-Briggs® and MBTI® are registered trademarks of the MBTI Trust, Inc., which has no affiliation with this site. Truity offers a free personality test based on Myers and Briggs' types, but does not offer the official MBTI® assessment. For more information on the Myers Briggs Type Indicator® assessment, please go here.

The Five Love Languages® is a registered trademark of The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, which has no affiliation with this site. You can find more information about the five love languages here.

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