How ESTJs can Develop Empathy – And Why It’s Essential for their Success

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on September 18, 2017

ESTJs are take-charge, confident people who live in the concrete world of facts and rules. As traditionalists, they like to make sure that everything is running like clockwork and that standards, laws and values are upheld. As a result, they often move into leadership roles where their strongly held beliefs can be put into action.

These go-getters don’t usually have any difficulty expressing themselves, especially when they feel someone is out of line. Their honest and straightforward approach ensures their desires are communicated clearly so that the job gets done properly.

Category: ESTJ

5 Tips for Painlessly Scaling Your Team

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on September 06, 2017

The problem of scaling a team is tough to crack. How do you add more members without breaking the spirit of the existing members? At what point do the old ways of doing things stop working? How can you be sure that the team is scaling at the right rate and in the right way? Success can turn on a small detail, such as a personality clash or one outdated process. What should a team leader do to avoid messing up?

What To Do When Your Personality Is Extraverted But Your Life Isn’t

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on September 04, 2017

We often encounter a misleading stereotype about Extraverts: talkative, party-loving individuals who travel in herds. Such a description matches only a few Extravert profiles such as the ESFP (The Performer) or ESTP (The Dynamo). The truth is many Extraverts have jobs or home lives that are rather isolating, and it severely drains their energy levels. If you’re an Extravert, maybe you can relate to some of these situations.

Categories: ENFP, ENFJ, ENTP, ENTJ, ESTP, ESTJ, ESFP, ESFJ

ISFJs at Work - How to Take Off the Invisibility Cloak

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on August 28, 2017

Picture Mark. He goes to work every day, does what he’s told without asking questions, helps his co-workers when he’s asked, and generally, does his work behind the scenes never asking to be praised for it. Mark knows when everyone’s birthdays and other special occasions are, and he always remembers to congratulate them. Once, he helped John, who he shares his office with, avoid a serious argument with his wife. Mark remembered their anniversary and reminded John just in time for him to buy his lovely wife a present.

How to Talk About Mistakes (So You Can All Just Move On)

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on August 23, 2017

To improve future performance, teams must learn from their mistakes. Despite being an irrefutable truth, few teams do this well. This is not due to a lack of willingness on their part - most organizations devote countless hours to after-action reviews, project postmortems and similar analysis to help the team reflect on what it did wrong and avoid similar mistakes in the future. More often than not, these actions fail to drive any real change in future outcomes.

Why You Have Every Damn Right to Disappoint People

Let's be honest, I'm not a people pleaser. I don't try particularly hard to get people to like me, and I never take it personally when someone obviously doesn't. My tolerance for conflict is higher than most, and I'm not afraid to land a few home-truth punches when someone steps out of line. (No one is allowed to feed my insecurities but me). I want to be liked—who doesn't? But I won't kiss ass for a superficial seal of approval. So the phrase "people pleaser" never really entered my mind.

When Your Team is Remote, Does Personality Even Matter?

Understanding the various personalities on your team is important for getting people working together in the way you'd like. That is why so many organizations use the personality assessment created by Katharine Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers when putting together effective teams. Personality assessment tools can help select the right team members - people who are likely to bond, innovate, and follow through on the company's goals such that the output of the team is greater than that of its constituent members.

Can NF Types Excel in Business?

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on August 07, 2017

If you’re an NF type, like I am, then you’ve probably seen all the articles that recommend we pursue careers in health care, counseling, or other selfless, “people-helping” fields. That advice works out just great for some people.

But what if you’re an NF who wants to excel in business. Is it possible?

As an INFJ with a marketing degree and about four years’ worth of business experience, I’ve struggled with this question a lot.

Latest Tweets

Get Our Newsletter