Should I Become a Veterinarian?

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on December 11, 2013

If the field of veterinary medicine intrigues and attracts you, your affection and concern for animals is already a given. Animals have likely played an important part in your life since childhood, and the thought of dedicating your life to servicing their needs and protecting their welfare no doubt strikes you as a fine and noble career choice.

Should I Become a Doctor?

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on December 03, 2013

If you’ve gotten this far, you probably already have a sense of whether you have the academic ability to become a physician. But the more important question is, will you be satisfied and successful with a career as a doctor?

This may seem like an impossible question to answer. But you don’t need a crystal ball to decide whether a career as a doctor will make you happy. All you need is to learn a bit more about the key personality traits and characteristics that successful, satisfied doctors have—and then decide if your personality fits the bill!

Can My Personality Type Change?

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on June 21, 2013

Welcome to our new Expert Q&A series! In this blog series we offer full, unrestricted access to the cluttered minds of our research team to answer your most pressing questions about personality, psychology, and psychometric tests. Have a question? Send it on over to questions@truity.com

Our first question is from our friend Areej...

Why Universities Have a Liberal Bias: It's Science!

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on June 12, 2012

We often hear this lament from American conservatives: the majority of our universities are run by liberals, attended by liberals, and turning out more liberals by the thousand. Theories abound as to why this is. Perhaps we're dealing with a vast conspiracy of power-hungry eggheads, masterminding schemes of liberal indoctrination from ivory towers full of pipe smoke.

Perhaps—but we don't think so. We think there's a reasonable explanation for all of it: science. Specifically, personality psychology.

Artistic Careers You Don't Have to Starve For

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on February 21, 2012

Most of us were encouraged to be artistic when we were children. From drawings and dioramas to noodle jewelry and collages, art is an integral part of a child’s life and no school day is complete without time for arts and crafts. As we grow older, however, we are counseled to settle into practical careers and to confine our artistic impulses to hobbies, if we pursue them at all. There is definitely some wisdom to this advice, as it is very rare for the average person to support oneself as a full-time artist. Therefore, if you feel that you are an artist at heart, it is likely that you also feel torn between pursing your passion for art and finding a well-paying and stable career.

5 Ways to Meet an INFJ

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on January 16, 2012

At just 1.5% of the US population, INFJs can be hard to find. Some of us will go our entire lives without running into one! But if you’re bound and determined to encounter this, the rare blue diamond of personality types, here are some ways to increase your chances.

Categories: Myers Briggs, INFJ

Non-Working Hours: The Importance of Downtime

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on August 25, 2011

Whatever your career path might be, chances are that you stay very busy. A job takes many hours out of a person's day – whether time spent on the job or time spent driving to and from the job – and those are the hours people tend to focus on, often to the exclusion of their non-working hours. Those hours away from the job, though, can be wonderfully beneficial in shaping a more well-rounded life. Self-care, too often overlooked, should be prioritized. Workaholics, take heed: here's to the importance of downtime.

4 Hot Careers for ISTJs

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on August 15, 2011

Two words describe the ISTJ: organized and orderly. ISTJs take a tidy approach to life and find meaning in the expression of their strong sense of duty. They prefer security and tradition over the unknown and the theoretical. Hot careers for ISTJs give these hardworking, detail-oriented people opportunities to demonstrate their dependability and put into action their strong work ethics.

Personality Types and Office Politics: Sensors and Intuitives

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on August 04, 2011

In the terminology of personality type, sensors are hands-on people who prefer to process information about the world in terms of what they can see, hear, feel, touch, and taste. Intuitives, on the other hand, prefer to assimilate information about the world around them and process the data in an abstract, big-picture way. When they work together in an office, sensors and intuitives might find their working relationships rife with misunderstandings unless they can try to mutually understand and respect one another's differences. By doing so, they'll contribute to harmony in the workplace, fostering on office politics that are based on cooperation, not conflict.

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