Understanding How Judgers and Perceivers Approach Business Goals

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on July 02, 2015

It's no surprise that Judging and Perceiving types do things differently at work, especially when it comes to managing their business goals. Judgers approach life in a structured manner, creating plans to fulfill tasks in a predictable way. Perceivers, on the other hand, tend to feel constrained by structure, as they prefer to keep their options open and use their time to explore problems as they come. To a Perceiver, a Judging personality type is rigid and single-minded, while to a Judger, the Perceiver is an aimless drifter.

Five Excellent Careers for Asocial People

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on June 30, 2015

We are constantly told how important social skills are to career success. But what if you don’t have many people skills — and don’t want to acquire any, either? Here’s a look at five stimulating, well-paying jobs where the quality of your work matters more than your ability to schmooze.

Problem-Solving Tips for Thinkers and Feelers

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on June 16, 2015

In the personality typing system developed by Myers and Briggs, the Thinking/Feeling pairing describes how a person makes decisions. A Thinking type uses objectivity to solve a problem, even when considering a moral or aesthetic puzzle. Feelers, on the other hand, make decisions based on their internal belief system. Feelers also solve problems using a system guided by their internal values and motivations rather than extrinsic facts. Because of these opposing styles, Thinkers and Feelers face challenges when tasked with solving problems as a team.

Q&A: Which Personality Types Are Most Compatible in Love?

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on June 16, 2015

Q. I think a lot of people would love to know which types experience the happiest marriages together. I've read "Just Your Type" in which the Tiegers share their research. It's very helpful, but they don't share which types are happiest together. I would love to know which types are happiest with ENFPs and which types ENFPs are happiest with. Please share this information if you have it.

-April

A. Hi April,

Politics and Emotions: What Would it Take To Change Your Mind?

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on June 01, 2015

When it comes to your politics, what would it take to shift your position? Are you stone cold committed to the end, or will you flex your stance to accommodate new information or a shift in circumstances? Where you stand on the political spectrum may provide some interesting insights into how likely it is that you would consider a new policy, and what it would take to persuade you.  

Locking Horns: Helping TJ and FP Personality Types Overcome Conflict

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on April 21, 2015

Disagreement is inevitable when you work with others; people have diverse opinions, contexts and viewpoints that can sometimes escalate to full-blown conflict. How you handle that conflict determines whether you get a productive outcome or the conflict destroys your team.

One common source of workplace conflict is the clash between thinking-judging (TJ) and feeling-perceiving (FP) types on the MBTI scale. Fortunately, it's possible to cut through the dissonance by understanding what makes these dichotomous personalities tick.

5 Reasons Introverts Make Better Leaders

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on April 15, 2015

It may seem counterintuitive to suggest that introverts – those individuals who live inside their own heads and aren’t the happiest around large crowds – could make effective leaders. But, taking a look at a few well known introverted leaders like Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Albert Einstein, and Abraham Lincoln can quickly dispel the myth that one cannot be both introverted and a great leader. In fact, some of the best introverted leaders will use those tendencies to push themselves ahead of the pack. Here are five reasons why introverts excel as leaders:

Putting the "I" Back in Team: How to Make Group Tasks Introvert-Friendly

Clinically Reviewed by Steven Melendy, PsyD. on April 13, 2015

Who steps up to the plate when you establish a group-brainstorm environment? All too often, it's the go-getting ENTJs, ESFPs and other extroverted types who take the lead — often because they associate leadership with extroverted traits such as speaking up, taking control and directing others. The problem however, is that these dynamic voices end up drowning out the introverts in the group. Here's how to put the "I" in "team" and help your organization's introverts thrive in a group environment.

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