Introvert? Here's Why Opening Up Can Feel Like Oversharing

It’s no secret that Introverts like their privacy but, for many introverted folks, opening up doesn’t come naturally – not even to those we trust and love. As a chatty INFJ who’s often mistaken for an Extravert, I, too, have wondered why it is so hard for me to share how I feel with those closest to me.

How to Let Go of Grudges, Advice from a Judger

Do you find yourself holding a grudge for months or maybe even years? Well you’re not alone. Many of us hold grudges as a way of dealing with disappointment. This is a common trait for a whole range of personality types but especially for those with a Judging preference on the Myers and Briggs personality system.

How to Work With ‘Get it Right’ People

If your job requires teamwork or supervision, you’ll inevitably be forced to deal with at least one ‘get-it-right’ personality. These people tend to be technically competent, well researched, and highly professional, which makes them hugely valuable in the workplace. They go absolutely in-depth into subjects, taking huge bites instead of small nibbles. 

Why You Need To Get Out Of Your Head and Into Your Body to Get The Most Out Of Your Personality System

The Big Five, DISC, Myers and Briggs, the Enneagram — all these personality systems help you understand yourself and other people better. By learning your own personality traits and those of others, you can begin to understand the inherent strengths and potential pitfalls we all possess.

Holiday Tips for Introverts: When You Want to be Alone But Hate to be Forgotten

The holiday season is a time to connect with loved ones, but it can be a stressful time for Introverts who are trying to keep up. Getting enough alone time is important to introverted types, but if they’re skipping events to be alone, they often feel a major case of FOMO. So how do you balance the much-needed time to recharge with the demanding social calendar of the holidays? 

This Is You At Your Best and Your Worst In Relationships, Based On Your Myers-Briggs Personality Type

No one enjoys feeling vulnerable, and romantic relationships tend to be where we are exposed the most. That’s the place with the highest stakes; where even a small shift in dynamics can leave you feeling insecure and off balance. While we’re all different, how we navigate our relationships is closely intertwined with our Myers and Briggs personality preferences. Check out your personality type below to see what you look like in a relationship—at your very best and your absolute worst.  

What Were RBG’s Myers-Briggs and Enneagram Types?

Quiet, stylish, driven and yet “notorious” for her hard-hitting, impassioned dissents, the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was one of the most complex and inspirational public figures of the last few decades. And if it feels like RBG-types are hard to find, you’re absolutely right.

RBG was an INTJ personality type. And INTJ women are the rarest gender-type match in the Myers-Briggs system. 

Things I Learned from my ESFJ Mother

It shames me to say this but: I was never in awe of my mother. When I was a child, she embarrassed me. I despaired at her lack of ambition, her loyal commitment to soulless, exploitative jobs that she was far too good for, her uncomplaining acceptance of her lot in life. We lived a life of duty and routines. There were no expectations of achievement; it was almost unthinkable for me to aspire to go to university, the first in my family to achieve this goal. My notions of what I would do with my life were so brutally segregated from hers, it was like being raised by wolves. 

INTJ: Are You Judged as Confident or Arrogant?

In my youth, I was friends with someone who I now believe — with the 20/20 vision of hindsight — to be an ESTP personality type.  A classic entrepreneur, my friend was bold, direct, a fan of taking risks, box-defying and incredibly sociable. His superpower was turning every mundane gathering into a party.

Some other things I noticed about my friend:

10 Career Struggles Only INTJs Will Understand

INTJs have a mixed experience in the workplace. All the data we’ve collected suggests that they outrank most other personality types – and certainly the other introverted types – salary-wise, and they also perform well in the category of very high earners making over $150,000 USD a year. If we accept salary as a proxy for success, then INTJs appear to be doing well for themselves. 

THE FINE PRINT: Myers-Briggs® and MBTI® are registered trademarks of the MBTI Trust, Inc., which has no affiliation with this site. Truity offers a free personality test based on Myers and Briggs' types, but does not offer the official MBTI® assessment. For more information on the Myers Briggs Type Indicator® assessment, please go here.

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